Human Waste Could Be The Next Big Weapon in Controlling COVID-19

If you’re a student or a faculty member who spends any time on the University of California, San Diego campus, you may know a lot more about what’s in your pee and poop—and that of your colleagues—than you might care to admit. Members of the UCSD community can download an app that tells them the COVID-19 status of the wastewater generated in the buildings where they spend the most time. In fact, it offers quite a bit of additional detail too, telling users whether any disease-causing microbes are flourishing in that sewage. If the COVID-19 virus is detected, campus regulars get a notification that they might be either infected or exposed, and they are urged to get tested. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] The system has already helped to reduce COVID-19 cases dramatically on campus, from 80-90% of wastewater samples testing positive for the virus between Thanksgiving and January, to only 5% in recent months. The sampling “really gives us an unprecedented ability to track the pandemic day by day as the waves of cases go up and down on campus,” says Rob Knight, professor of pediatrics, computer and engineering and director of the center for microbiome innovation at UCSD. Not only that, but Knight and his students were also able to use wastewater samples to zero in on people who were likely infected with the virus, but asymptomatic. They placed robots to sample wastewater from individual buildings in sewage pipes before they joined ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has provoked an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which has affected 130 million people worldwide and caused nearly 3 million deaths in just over 1 year [1]. In 2020, COVID-19 represented the third highest cause of death in the USA after heart disease and cancer [2], and this outbreak has led to the largest drop in life expectancy since World War II [2]. Evidence-based medical treatment of COVID-19 (anticoagulants, corticosteroids, anti-inflammatory drugs, oxygenation therapy and ventilation) [3] seems to have improved patients&...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Editorials Source Type: research
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Summer 2021 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities &Related Notices NIH/HHS News Subscribe to NICDR News Science Advances   Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR to Release Report on Oral Health in America As a 20-year follow-up to the seminal Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General, NIDCR will release Oral Health in America: Advances and Challenges in the fall of 2021. The report will illuminate new directions ...
Source: NIDCR Science News - Category: Dentistry Source Type: news
Conclusions: The sharp slowdown in cancer screening during the first wave of COVID-19 could seriously endanger cancer prevention in the near future.
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: In conclusion, in the present study asymptomatic cancer patients revealed 17% seropositivity, approximately equal to the general population of the same age, sex, geographic region, and epidemic status. Asymptomatic infections should further be investigated and considered as playing an important role in the COVID-19 transmission chain.PMID:34181320 | DOI:10.31557/APJCP.2021.22.6.1667
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Tumori. 2021 Jun 28:3008916211022848. doi: 10.1177/03008916211022848. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTAIM: To understand how patients with cancer reacted to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and whether their quality of life (QoL) was affected.METHODS: In June 2020, 111 patients with cancer treated in the supportive care unit of a Comprehensive Cancer Center in Milan and 201 healthy controls from the general population were enrolled and assessed both quantitatively and qualitatively for fears and COVID-19-related beliefs as well as for QoL.RESULTS: Fear of COVID-19 was significantly lower among patients (41% v...
Source: Tumori - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: In conclusion, in the present study asymptomatic cancer patients revealed 17% seropositivity, approximately equal to the general population of the same age, sex, geographic region, and epidemic status. Asymptomatic infections should further be investigated and considered as playing an important role in the COVID-19 transmission chain.PMID:34181320 | DOI:10.31557/APJCP.2021.22.6.1667
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Tumori. 2021 Jun 28:3008916211022848. doi: 10.1177/03008916211022848. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTAIM: To understand how patients with cancer reacted to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and whether their quality of life (QoL) was affected.METHODS: In June 2020, 111 patients with cancer treated in the supportive care unit of a Comprehensive Cancer Center in Milan and 201 healthy controls from the general population were enrolled and assessed both quantitatively and qualitatively for fears and COVID-19-related beliefs as well as for QoL.RESULTS: Fear of COVID-19 was significantly lower among patients (41% v...
Source: Tumori - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: In conclusion, in the present study asymptomatic cancer patients revealed 17% seropositivity, approximately equal to the general population of the same age, sex, geographic region, and epidemic status. Asymptomatic infections should further be investigated and considered as playing an important role in the COVID-19 transmission chain.PMID:34181320 | DOI:10.31557/APJCP.2021.22.6.1667
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Tumori. 2021 Jun 28:3008916211022848. doi: 10.1177/03008916211022848. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTAIM: To understand how patients with cancer reacted to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and whether their quality of life (QoL) was affected.METHODS: In June 2020, 111 patients with cancer treated in the supportive care unit of a Comprehensive Cancer Center in Milan and 201 healthy controls from the general population were enrolled and assessed both quantitatively and qualitatively for fears and COVID-19-related beliefs as well as for QoL.RESULTS: Fear of COVID-19 was significantly lower among patients (41% v...
Source: Tumori - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: In conclusion, in the present study asymptomatic cancer patients revealed 17% seropositivity, approximately equal to the general population of the same age, sex, geographic region, and epidemic status. Asymptomatic infections should further be investigated and considered as playing an important role in the COVID-19 transmission chain.PMID:34181320 | DOI:10.31557/APJCP.2021.22.6.1667
Source: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
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