Why We Must Improve Vaccine Manufacturing Before the Next Pandemic

It should worry everyone that experts surveyed by TIME regarded both increasing funding in a post-COVID-19 world for vaccine development and scaling up of manufacturing capacity feasible—but improving equitable vaccine distribution was not. To stop the next pandemic in its tracks we need to ensure that people all over the world are protected quickly, and that will entail having all these pieces in place. The good news is, all these elements are feasible, and indeed starting to work today. On vaccine R&D, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), was set up with the precise purpose of identifying and investing in R&D for vaccines against emerging infectious diseases with epidemic potential. So, when it came to COVID-19, with CEPI’s and other R&D support, as well as industry engagement, the scientific and vaccine manufacturing community rallied, producing the first safe and effective vaccine in record time—just 327 days. Today we have not just one but 15 in widespread use. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Increased investment now could get us there even faster the next time, particularly given the potential of the relatively new RNA vaccine technologies that have proved so effective with COVID-19. These plug-and-play vaccine technologies not only make it possible to identify and develop antigens rapidly, but much of the regulatory testing and approval can be done in advance, even before we know what the threat is. As for manufact...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 health Magazine Source Type: news

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While the world awaits a proven COVID-19 vaccine, medical experts are turning their attention to a shot that’s long been a key component in the public health toolbox: the flu vaccine. Experts hope this year’s flu shot can help prevent an influenza epidemic paired with another wave of coronavirus, which could overwhelm hospitals and lead to general confusion, given that it can be difficult to tell a COVID-19 infection from a case of the flu. This flu season is also something of a dress rehearsal for the eventual rollout of a COVID-19 vaccine amid the ongoing pandemic, allowing doctors, nurses and pharmacists a c...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a worldwide effect for what seems like an eternity. After shelter-in-place orders became more prevalent in March,  most people probably didn’t think they’d still be wearing masks in October. So the question remains, when will the pandemic end?  It turns out there are quite a few factors that contribute to the rise and fall of a pandemic, some within our control, some that are not. An outbreak becomes a pandemic when it meets two criteria, first, it spreads rapidly and widely, and second, it must qualify as a severe disease. If either of these factors change, it is no long...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Coronavirus COVID COVID-19 COVID-19 Feature Source Type: blogs
An influenza epidemic alongside the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic -- it's the "twindemic" that health officials are trying to avoid. Dr. Gregory Poland, a Mayo Clinic vaccine expert, explains why getting a flu vaccination is so important. Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute https://youtu.be/RnxmIRevkZE Journalists: Broadcast-quality video (0:59) is in the downloads at the end of this [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news
This article was originally published by the Frontline Health Workers coalition on September 30, 2020.Read it here.
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Global health security Source Type: news
There are few things as powerful as avoidance learning. Touch a hot stove once and you’re not likely to do it again. Cross against the light and almost get hit by a car and you’re going to be a lot more careful the next time. But when it comes to the U.S. response to COVID-19? Not so much. You’d have thought that the sight of overflow hospital tents and refrigerated trucks to hold victims’ bodies in New York would have been enough to scare us all straight in mid-March and early April, when infection rates peaked at 32,000 new cases a day, or nearly 10 cases per 100,000 residents—making social ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news
Jeffrey A. SingerSome observers of our policy toward the coronavirus pandemiccriticize the tendency to focus on case numbers alone, when hospitalization rates and fatality rates are what really matter. And as we learn more about the COVID virus, mitigation and treatment is improving and fatalities are diminishing.Similarly, the U.S. Department of Justice ’s policy toward the overdose epidemic seems to be focused on arrests and drug interdictions, apparent in a DOJpress release today, itemizing the arrests of drug traffickers and seizures of illegal drugs that have resulted since “Operation SOS&rd...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
We present advances in modeling techniques that have led to fundamental disease discoveries and impacted clinical translation.Recent FindingsCombining mechanistic models and machine learning algorithms has led to improvements in the treatment ofShigella and tuberculosis through the development of novel compounds. Modeling of the epidemic dynamics of malaria at the within-host and between-host level has afforded the development of more effective vaccination and antimalarial therapies. Similarly, in-host and host-host models have supported the development of new HIV treatment modalities and an improved understanding of the i...
Source: Current Pathobiology Reports - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Researchers who adapted standard epidemiological models to explore how the COVID-19 pandemic trajectory might unfold in the next five years report diverse scenarios ranging from recurring severe epidemics to elimination.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
r U Abstract For a long time, most of the infectious diseases seemed to have become under control. In particular, vaccinations have contributed to this development. In recent years newly occurring bacterial infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens and viral infections, such as the chikungunya virus, influenza epidemics and currently the COVID-19 pandemic, are endangering the world population. This specifically affects patients with rheumatological diseases, who often require immunosuppressive therapy and are thus at risk for infections. Vaccinations can protect those affected, both individually and ...
Source: Zeitschrift fur Rheumatologie - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Z Rheumatol Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has major health and economic impacts. We review disease characteristics in children.Recent FindingsChildren comprise 1 –2% of the diagnosed cases, and typically suffer mild disease. The median age of infected children is 3.3–11 years, and male/female ratio is 1.15–1.55. Common symptoms in children include upper respiratory symptoms (26–54%), cough (44–54%), fever (32–65%), and gastrointestinal (15–30% ) symptoms. Substantial proportion (4–23%) are asymptomatic. Death rates are up to 0.7%. Risk factors...
Source: Current Infectious Disease Reports - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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