‘ Let ’ s Talk About Sex ’ Discussion Highlights Risks to Women

Nordic Talk moderator Katja Iversen shown here with Natasha Wang Mwansa, Emi Mahmoud, Dr Natalia Kanem and Flemming Møller Mortensen during a recent Nordic Talks webinar. Credit: Shuprova TasneemBy Shuprova Tasneem and Nayema NusratDHAKA and NEW YORK, Jun 4 2021 (IPS) Every two minutes, a girl or woman dies from pregnancy or childbirth-related complications, including unsafe abortions. Every year, around 12 million girls are married while in their childhoods. An additional 10 million are now at risk of child marriage due to the Covid-19 pandemic. In this context, the most recent Nordic Talk—a high-level debate on bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) as a cornerstone of gender equality, aptly titled “Let’s Talk About Sex” — could not have come at a better time. Moderator Katja Iversen, Dane of the Year (2018) and former CEO of Women Deliver, kicked off the discussion by focusing on the close link between bodily autonomy, gender equality, economic growth, and a healthy planet. In an exclusive interview with IPS, Iversen said it was clear that “bodily autonomy for girls and women—in all their rich diversity—is political, social, economic and health-related.” Women needed to have power and agency over their “bodies, fertility, and future, living a life free of violence and coercion in both the private and public sphere. It ties into norms, structure, systems – and if we wan...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Civil Society Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Gender Gender Violence Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

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After being epidemic in China, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) infection has rapidly spread in many countries as a global pandemic, with the number of affected cases dramatically increasing worldwide on a daily basis. Although the median age of hospitalized patients with confirmed infection is usually more advanced 1, with older age reported to be associated to higher mortality rate 2, physiological adaptations occurring during pregnancy have been claimed to be potentially responsible for a more severe respiratory disease, thus leading to higher rates of maternal and fetal complications 3,4.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
[Global Sisters Report] Machakos -- Sarah, who is four months pregnant, ponders her fate as she sits in front of her house - watching her peers play outside their homestead in this settlement located 39 miles southeast of the capital, Nairobi. With her kanga wrapper tied around her bust and another colorful one on her waist, Sarah says she will not be returning to school even when coronavirus restrictions are eased.
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - Category: OBGYN Source Type: news
An enigmatic epidemiological feature of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is the high rate of asymptomatic infection in pregnant women.1 This is puzzling because systemic immune changes predispose pregnant women to increased severity of respiratory viral infections, especially influenza A.2 A major roadblock in understanding this atypical clinical presentation is the poor characterization of cellular entry factors for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) — angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and the androgen-sensitive transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) — in the respiratory tract during pregnancy.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Research Letter Source Type: research
Authors: Recker F, Weber E, Strizek B, Gembruch U, Seibel A Abstract In the current coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, certain patients are becoming seriously ill. Lung pathologies are common, and some patients even go on to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which requires intubation and artificial respiration of the critically ill patient. Imaging of the lung is absolutely necessary to obtain a diagnosis, assess the course of disease and for treatment. Particularly in gynecology and obstetrics (OBGYN), ultrasound scans of the lung can be a useful additional tool when caring for pregnant patients in...
Source: Geburtshilfe und Frauenheilkunde - Category: OBGYN Tags: Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by a novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was declared a pandemic in January 2020. Although most of the cases in pregnant women are mild, there are reports of increasing severe infection in pregnancy. Only a few case of SARS-CoV-2 infection in preterm neonates delivered by mothers with COVID-19 have been reported till date.
Source: Pediatrics and Neonatology - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: Short Communication Source Type: research
In January of this year, oblivious of the fact that we were about to engage in a twisted round of real-life Jumanji, we released our annual digital health trends e-book. Among one of our 12 forecasts for 2020 was that at-home blood tests would gain traction and become the new direct-to-consumer DNA testing in terms of adoption and availability. While the pandemic threw everyone off guard and messed up regular forecasts, we might have been onto something with our predicted trend. With the need to limit physical contact and trace COVID-positive individuals rapidly, public health authorities worldwide are finding rapid, po...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy fda testing outbreak covid19 at-home tests WHO point-of-care POC antibodies virus nasal swab test PCR Abbot Source Type: blogs
Purpose of review The purpose of this review is highlighting the most recent evidence on the clinical efficacy and toxicity of antimalarials in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Recent findings New data confirm the effects of antimalarials in preventing SLE activity, damage and infections and in decreasing mortality. An important reduction in use of health resources is related to continued antimalarial use. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) may prevent preeclampsia in pregnant women with SLE. HCQ ocular toxicity is infrequent and could be associated with blood levels. Gastrointestinal and skin toxicity are underrecognized an...
Source: Current Opinion in Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND SJOGREN SYNDROME: Edited by Mariana J. Kaplan Source Type: research
Abstract In response to the Coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, sweeping changes were made to obstetric care. Many practices rapidly converted to telehealth visits or drive-through obstetric services (Turrentine M et al, Obstet Gynecol 2020; 136(1):29-32). Others modified out-patient care practices such as reducing the number of ultrasounds or antenatal surveillance visits. In the manuscript by van-de-I'Isle and colleagues, the authors evaluated if a change to gestational diabetes (GDM) screening guidelines suggested by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) during the COVID-19 pandemic cha...
Source: BJOG : An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: BJOG Source Type: research
Authors: Tolchin B, Latham SR, Bruce L, Ferrante LE, Kraschel K, Jubanyik K, Hull SC, Herbst JL, Kapo J, Moritz ED, Hughes J, Siegel MD, Mercurio MR Abstract The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has caused shortages of life-sustaining medical resources, and future waves of the virus may cause further scarcity. The Yale New Haven Health System developed a triage protocol to allocate scarce medical resources during the COVID-19 pandemic, with the primary goal of saving the most lives possible, and a secondary goal of making triage assessments and decisions consistent, transparent, and fair. We outline the process ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Ethics - Category: Medical Ethics Tags: J Clin Ethics Source Type: research
Abstract Although COVID-19 is predominantly a respiratory disease, it is known to affect multiple organ systems. In this article, we highlight the impact of SARS-CoV-2 (the coronavirus causing COVID-19) on the central nervous system as there is an urgent need to understand the longitudinal impacts of COVID-19 on brain function, behaviour and cognition. Furthermore, we address the possibility of intergenerational impacts of COVID-19 on the brain, potentially via both maternal and paternal routes. Evidence from preclinical models of earlier coronaviruses has shown direct viral infiltration across the blood-brain bar...
Source: The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Aust N Z J Psychiatry Source Type: research
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