Statins warning: The dose and frequency that increases your risk of diabetes

STATINS provide a crucial buffer against heart disease by reducing bad cholesterol levels in the blood. However, research indicates that they can raise risk of diabetes at a certain frequency and dose.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the main cause of mortality worldwide. Risk factors of CVD can be classified into modifiable (smoking, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia) through lifestyle changes or taking drug therapy and not modifiable (age, ethnicity, sex and family history). Elevated total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels have a lead role in the development of coronary heart disease (CHD), while high levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) seem to have a protective role. The current treatment for dyslipidemia consists of lifestyle modification or drug...
Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Source Type: research
ConclusionCardiovascular morbidity was increased in patients with TA attending primary care services in the UK. Treatment with statins and anti ‐platelets in these patients was suboptimal.
Source: Arthritis and Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: FULL LENGTH Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Multimorbid patients with ACS are at a greater risk for worse outcomes than their nonmultimorbid counterparts. Lack of consistent measurement makes interpretation of the impact of multimorbidity challenging and emphasizes the need for more research on multimorbidity's effects on postdischarge healthcare utilization. PMID: 32925234 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: J Cardiovasc Nurs Source Type: research
Primary prevention guidelines recommend the use of the Framingham risk score (FRS) to estimate the 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in patients without diabetes for statin eligibility. However, the FR...
Source: BMC Family Practice - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of VRK-1 in regulation of adult life span in C. elegans. We found that overexpression of VRK-1::GFP (green fluorescent protein), which was detected in the nuclei of cells in multiple somatic tissues, including the intestine, increased life span. Conversely, genetic inhibition of vrk-1 decreased life span. We further showed that vrk-1 was essential for the increased life span of mitochondrial respiratory mutants. We demonstrated that VRK-1 was responsible for increasing the level of active and phosphorylated form of AMPK, thus promoting longevity. A Fisetin Variant, C...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
When people say "cardiovascular disease" in the context of blood cholesterol, they mean atherosclerosis. This is the name given to the build up of fatty deposits that narrow and weaken blood vessels, leading to heart failure and ultimately some form of disabling or fatal rupture - a stroke or heart attack. The primary approach to treatment is the use of lifestyle choices and drugs such as statins to lower cholesterol carried by LDL particles in the blood. Unfortunately, the evidence strongly suggests that this is the wrong approach, in that the benefits are small and unreliable. Atherosclerosis does occur ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading killer of both women and men in the US. Despite the significant impact CVD has on women, awareness and education for women’s heart disease has historically been low. A recent study, based on data from over two million patients, suggests that women were less likely to be prescribed aspirin, statins, and certain blood pressure medications compared to men. CVD is a group of diseases involving the heart or blood vessels. It includes high blood pressure (hypertension), coronary artery disease, heart attacks, heart failure, heart valve problems, and abnormal heart rhythms. CVD ca...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Heart Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Purpose of review To discuss the current evidence regarding the relationship between omega-3 fatty acid intake and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. Recent findings Combined results from randomized controlled trials using low-dosage (≤1.8 g/day of ethyl esters) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or EPA + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) suggest a small benefit for reducing coronary heart disease risk. The Reduction of Cardiovascular Events with EPA-Intervention Trial (REDUCE-IT) that administered 4 g/day icosapent ethyl (IPE) to individuals on statin at high or very high ASCVD risk with elevated triglycer...
Source: Current Opinion in Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: LIPIDS AND EMERGING RISK FACTORS: Edited by Dimitri P. Mikhailidis and Anthony S. Wierzbicki Source Type: research
The COVID crisis has decimated water exercise. Can we rethink pool closures? A significant number of my older patients relied on pools for their fitness. During a pandemic, you can stay active or fit only if you have good legs and joints. Walkers, runners, and cyclists have no problem; they play outside in the Spring weather. People with bone/joint problems, fitness swimmers, and young children who normally take swim lessons this time of year are out of luck. Consider the place I swim—the Mary T Meagher Natatorium, named after Mary T, a Louisville native, who won Olympic gold in 1984. The place is an ode to Sp...
Source: Dr John M - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) Nearly every medication has side effects, but sometimes people are willing to take them on to get some sort of benefit. And while no one wants to deal with heart disease and its effects on the body, taking popular cholesterol medications could bring on another potentially deadly illness: type 2 diabetes. This is...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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