Large numbers of regular drug users report increased substance use during COVID-19

(Centre for Addiction and Mental Health) People who regularly use psychoactive substances report experiencing a variety of negative impacts since the COVID-19 pandemic began, including increased usage and fear of relapse or overdose, highlighting the need for improved supports and services, including better access to safe supply programs, according to a new CAMH survey published in the International Journal of Drug Policy.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Related Links:

Data from an emergency department in Richmond suggests that the number of nonfatal opioid-related overdoses may have risen during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly among people who are Black. Thefindings were published inJAMA.Taylor A. Ochalek, Ph.D., of Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and colleagues compared the number of nonfatal opioid overdoses recorded in electronic medical records from VCU ’s Emergency Department from March to June 2019 with those that occurred from March to June 2020—the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic. They found nonfatal opioid overdoses incre...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: black COVID-19 emergency department JAMA nonfatal overdose opioid pandemic Source Type: research
Conclusions: Jails and prisons with existing OAT programs have curtailed their operations in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Given the robust evidence base around OAT for treating opioid use disorder and averting overdose deaths, guidance is needed on maintaining and ramping up medication access as carceral facilities grapple with implementing COVID-19 mitigation.
Source: Journal of Addiction Medicine - Category: Addiction Tags: Brief Reports Source Type: research
Mikayla Mace A University of Arizona pharmacologist discusses how the conditions created by the pandemic and the response could be exacerbating drug use and overdose. Monday University Communicationssad-505857_1920.jpgHealthCOVID-19Researcher contact: Todd W. Vanderah Comprehensive Pain and Addiction Center 520-626-7801vanderah@email.arizona.eduMedia contact: Mikayla Mace University Communications 520-621-1878mikaylamace@arizona.edu For the latest on the University of Arizona response to the novel coronavirus, visit the university'sCOVID-19 webpage.For UANews coverage of COVID-19, visithttps://uanews.arizona.edu/...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
Jeffrey A. SingerThe COVID-19 pandemic has placed another stumbling block in the way of the Drug Enforcement Administration ’sfutile effort to reduce the country ’s drug overdose rate through quotas on the manufacture of all forms of prescription opioids.The DEA ’s annual quotas have brought production levels more than 50 percent below 2016 levels. But, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the agency increased this year’s quota by 15 percent, to allow drug makers to respond to pandemic‐​induced shortages. Intravenous opioids such as fentanyl are va luable tools used to manage patients on ventil...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Deaths involving illicit opioids, stimulants (such as methamphetamine), heroin, and cocaine rose dramatically between 2015 and the end of 2019, according to areport released Monday by the AMA ’s Opioid Task Force.The report also showed a 37.1% decrease in opioid prescribing; wider use of state Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs; and increasing numbers of doctors trained to prescribe buprenorphine (a medication used for treating opioid use disorder).The trends indicate that the nature of the nation ’s drug overdose crisis has changed. “The nation’s drug overdose epidemic is now being driven predom...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: AMA AMA Opioid Task Force buprenorphine CDC cocaine fentanyl heroin medication-assisted treatment mental health parity opioid use disorder opioids Patrice Harris stimulants Source Type: research
In 1974, President Nixon signed the Narcotic Addiction Treatment Act, which gave statutory authority to the regulations governing the provision of methadone for the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD) in the US. The original name for the bill was revealing: the Methadone Diversion Control Act. These regulations that were meant to restrict dispensation on methadone have undergone only modest revision over the ensuing decades even in the midst of a current overdose epidemic. In the US, methadone for OUD can only be provisioned at federally certified opioid treatment programs (OTPs). Patients receiving methadone must prese...
Source: JAMA Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Jeffrey A. SingerWhite House “drug czar” Jim Carroll toldPolitico earlier this week that an Office of National Drug Control Policy analysis finds an 11.4 percent year ‐​over‐​year increase in opioid‐​related overdose deaths during the first four months of 2020. Kentucky has seen a 25 percent increase in overdose deaths during the first four months of this year, and West Virginia saw a 50 percent increase in deaths since the beginning of the year. The data are incomplete at this point, and not all states have reported in.Mr. Carroll attributed much of the increase in the overdose rate ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
The COVID19 crisis has created many additional challenges for patients with opioid use disorder, including those seeking treatment with medications for OUD. Some of these challenges include closure of substance use treatment clinics, focus of emergency departments on COVID-19 patients, social distancing and shelter in place orders affecting mental health, bystander overdose rescue, threats to income and supply of substances for people who use drugs. While the initial changes in regulation allowing buprenorphine prescribing by telehealth are welcomed by providers and patients, many additional innovations are required to ens...
Source: Journal of Addiction Medicine - Category: Addiction Tags: Commentaries Source Type: research
  What is the link between addiction and mental illness? Is addiction a choice? In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa discuss whether addiction should be classified as a disease and whether or not it should require medical treatment. Gabe also shares his personal story of addiction and how it tied in with his bipolar disorder. What’s your take? Tune in for an in-depth discussion which covers every angle of this often controversial topic. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We Love Written Reviews!  About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Recovery Source Type: blogs
Sara Wittner had seemingly gotten her life back under control. After a December relapse in her battle with drug addiction, the 32-year-old completed a 30-day detox program and started taking a monthly injection to block her cravings for opioids. She was engaged to be married, working for a local health advocacy group in Colorado, and counseling others about drug addiction. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit. The virus knocked down all the supports she had carefully built around her: no more in-person Narcotics Anonymous meetings, no talks over coffee with trusted friends or her addiction recovery sponsor. As the virus stressed...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
More News: Addiction | COVID-19 | International Medicine & Public Health | Men | Overdose | Pandemics