Patients at high risk of suicide before and during a COVID-19 lockdown: ecological momentary assessment study - Cobo A, Porras-Segovia A, P érez-Rodríguez MM, Artés-Rodríguez A, Barrigón ML, Courtet P, Baca-Garcia E.

In this study we explored the wish to die and other suicide risk factors using smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

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LSE finds country ’s sex-segregated distancing rules may have reproduced inequalities and injustices for trans peopleEach day when Pau Gonz ález wakes and looks at his phone, he feels as if he is running a call centre. As the founder of the activist groupHombres Trans Panama, he has been inundated by members of the transgender community seeking advice on how to navigate Panama ’s sex-segregated social distancing laws. Some callers have been cautioned or abused by police. Others report feeling suicidal and scared to go out.In April, Panama announced one of the most aggressive Covid-19 policies in Latin Am...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Global development Coronavirus outbreak LGBT rights Panama World news Americas Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news
CONCLUSION: A rise in local COVID-19 cases was associated with a decrease in mental health presentations to EDs. This has important implications for the planning and provision of healthcare services in the current pandemic. PMID: 32961096 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Australasian Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Australas Psychiatry Source Type: research
NIH is striving to combat the COVID-19 pandemic through a multifaceted approach, by supporting groundbreaking science and research and by promoting the health and safety of NIH staff. This includes ensuring the resources and support needed to manage stress and promote mental health are available. To support this effort, NIH presented this lecture on coping with the mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic by Dr. George Everly, Ph.D., followed by a conversation with NIH Director, Dr. Francis Collins. More information on mental health and coping with COVID-19 is available from the following federal agencies: CDC: Me...
Source: Videocast - All Events - Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video
An outbreak of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) that started in China at the end of 2019 has rapidly spread all over the world. COVID-19 is plaguing people not only physically but also psychologically, and cancer patients are particularly exposed to th...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news
After the outbreak of Coronavirus disease was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization, this resulted in extraordinary public health measures to control the infection, such as entire countries being placed under quarantine. The psychopathological consequences of the pandemic and quarantine were anticipated to be of particular relevance, especially in patients with psychiatric disorders such as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Aim of the present report was to describe the impact of COVID-19 pandemics within a sample of Italian patients affected by OCD. Sociodemographic and clinical variables of a sample of 1...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
In conclusion, quarantined participants were more likely than others to perceive discrimination and exhibit mental distress. It is important to integrate mental health care into the planning and implementation of quarantine measures. Future longitudinal studies to explore mechanisms underlying the mental health impact of quarantines are warranted. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
Source: American Psychologist - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Sara Wittner had seemingly gotten her life back under control. After a December relapse in her battle with drug addiction, the 32-year-old completed a 30-day detox program and started taking a monthly injection to block her cravings for opioids. She was engaged to be married, working for a local health advocacy group in Colorado, and counseling others about drug addiction. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit. The virus knocked down all the supports she had carefully built around her: no more in-person Narcotics Anonymous meetings, no talks over coffee with trusted friends or her addiction recovery sponsor. As the virus stressed...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Conclusion. During the epidemic period, in addition to strengthening the protection work, we should also monitor the mental and psychological state of the population to prevent mental illness caused by coronavirus. PMID: 32550035 [PubMed]
Source: Case Reports in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Case Rep Psychiatry Source Type: research
By ANISH MEHTA, MD My practice received its first question about coronavirus from a patient on January 28, 2020. Though there were over 200 deaths reported in China by that time, no one could have imagined how drastically this would come to disrupt our lives at home. Thankfully, I had a head start. As a doctor at an integrated telemedicine and primary care practice in New York City, nearly two out of every three of my medical encounters that month was already virtual. I spent much of January caring for patients who had contracted seasonal viruses, like influenza or norovirus (i.e. the stomach flu). My patients ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
The global novel coronavirus pandemic afflicting everyone is showing mixed signs of activity. In some countries it appears to be easing, while in others it appears to be experiencing a resurgence. It’s not at all clear when the pandemic will end, but it’s unlikely to do so before 2021. What has become increasingly clear is that the toll of the pandemic will impact more than the people who come down with COVID-19. The mental health impact of living with a pandemic is being mostly ignored — for now. But as the deaths continue to rise, we need to pay close attention to the cost of the pandemic’s reperc...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs
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