Pathways between COVID-19 public health responses and increasing overdose risks: a rapid review and conceptual framework - Nguyen T, Buxton JA.

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence indicates that illicit drug overdoses are increasing throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a paucity of evidence on the causative pathways for this trend, but expert opinions, commentaries, and some reviews offer theoreti...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Shreeram Akilesh, Cynthia C. Nast, Michifumi Yamashita, Kammi Henriksen, Vivek Charu, Megan L. Troxell, Neeraja Kambham, Erika Bracamonte, Donald Houghton, Naila I. Ahmed, Chyi Chyi Chong, Bijin Thajudeen, Shehzad Rehman, Firas Khoury, Jonathan E. Zuckerman, Jeremy Gitomer, Parthassarathy C. Raguram, Shanza Mujeeb, Ulrike Schwarze, M. Brendan Shannon
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Reumatología Clínica (English Edition)Author(s): Lina María Saldarriaga Rivera, Daniel Fernández Ávila, Wilson Bautista Molano, Daniel Jaramillo Arroyave, Alain Jasaf Bautista Ramírez, Adriana Díaz Maldonado, Jorge Hernán Izquierdo, Edwin Jáuregui, María Constanza Latorre Muñoz, Juan Pablo Restrepo, Juan Sebastián Segura Charry
Source: Reumatologia Clinica - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Authors: Bonn M, Palayew A, Bartlett S, Brothers TD, Touesnard N, Tyndall M Abstract People who use drugs (PWUD) face concurrent public health emergencies from overdoses, HIV, hepatitis C, and COVID-19, leading to an unprecedented syndemic. Responses to PWUD that go beyond treatment--such as decriminalization and providing a safe supply of pharmaceutical-grade drugs--could reduce impacts of this syndemic. Solutions already implemented for COVID-19, such as emergency safe-supply prescribing and providing housing to people experiencing homelessness, must be sustained once COVID-19 is contained. This pandemic is not o...
Source: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs - Category: Addiction Tags: J Stud Alcohol Drugs Source Type: research
Data from an emergency department in Richmond suggests that the number of nonfatal opioid-related overdoses may have risen during the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly among people who are Black. Thefindings were published inJAMA.Taylor A. Ochalek, Ph.D., of Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and colleagues compared the number of nonfatal opioid overdoses recorded in electronic medical records from VCU ’s Emergency Department from March to June 2019 with those that occurred from March to June 2020—the first few months of the COVID-19 pandemic. They found nonfatal opioid overdoses incre...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: black COVID-19 emergency department JAMA nonfatal overdose opioid pandemic Source Type: research
The year 2020 will go down in history as one of the most devastating in history. Hundreds of thousands have died and millions have been hospitalized due to the novel coronavirus pandemic. COVID-19 has changed the lives of so many. No matter where you live, dealing with the effects of economic and physical lockdowns in a community leads to multiple mental health challenges. After months of living with the coronavirus, many people are getting tired, burned out, and more and more frustrated. In America, we face a particular challenge. Our federal government has chosen to take a backseat during the pandemic. Instead of leadin...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Research coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic Source Type: blogs
Mikayla Mace A University of Arizona pharmacologist discusses how the conditions created by the pandemic and the response could be exacerbating drug use and overdose. Monday University Communicationssad-505857_1920.jpgHealthCOVID-19Researcher contact: Todd W. Vanderah Comprehensive Pain and Addiction Center 520-626-7801vanderah@email.arizona.eduMedia contact: Mikayla Mace University Communications 520-621-1878mikaylamace@arizona.edu For the latest on the University of Arizona response to the novel coronavirus, visit the university'sCOVID-19 webpage.For UANews coverage of COVID-19, visithttps://uanews.arizona.edu/...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
Deaths involving illicit opioids, stimulants (such as methamphetamine), heroin, and cocaine rose dramatically between 2015 and the end of 2019, according to areport released Monday by the AMA ’s Opioid Task Force.The report also showed a 37.1% decrease in opioid prescribing; wider use of state Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs; and increasing numbers of doctors trained to prescribe buprenorphine (a medication used for treating opioid use disorder).The trends indicate that the nature of the nation ’s drug overdose crisis has changed. “The nation’s drug overdose epidemic is now being driven predom...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: AMA AMA Opioid Task Force buprenorphine CDC cocaine fentanyl heroin medication-assisted treatment mental health parity opioid use disorder opioids Patrice Harris stimulants Source Type: research
  What is the link between addiction and mental illness? Is addiction a choice? In today’s Not Crazy podcast, Gabe and Lisa discuss whether addiction should be classified as a disease and whether or not it should require medical treatment. Gabe also shares his personal story of addiction and how it tied in with his bipolar disorder. What’s your take? Tune in for an in-depth discussion which covers every angle of this often controversial topic. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We Love Written Reviews!  About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Recovery Source Type: blogs
Sara Wittner had seemingly gotten her life back under control. After a December relapse in her battle with drug addiction, the 32-year-old completed a 30-day detox program and started taking a monthly injection to block her cravings for opioids. She was engaged to be married, working for a local health advocacy group in Colorado, and counseling others about drug addiction. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit. The virus knocked down all the supports she had carefully built around her: no more in-person Narcotics Anonymous meetings, no talks over coffee with trusted friends or her addiction recovery sponsor. As the virus stressed...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Why More Must be Done to Fight Bogus COVID-19 Cure Claims appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Source Type: news
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