New Report Calls for Improved Eating Habits in a World of Extremes

Barilla Center for Food &Nutrition Foundation (BCFN) has pioneered the food pyramid, which recommends both nutritious and good food for the planet. In its latest report, it makes recommendations for Africa. Credit: Anaya Katlego / UnsplashBy Ignatius BandaBULAWAYO, Zimbabwe, Apr 13 2021 (IPS) With the two extremes of global hunger and obesity on the increase, a new report suggests a radical reset for food and nutrition to ensure the long-term sustainability of livelihoods and the environment. According to a new Barilla Center for Food &Nutrition Foundation (BCFN) report, 690 million people globally lack sufficient food. COVID-19 has worsened these conditions, and it’s projected that between 83 and 132 million more people will join the ranks of the undernourished because of interrupted livelihoods caused by the pandemic. A BCFN report, “A one health approach to food – The Double Pyramid connecting food culture, health and climate”, raises concerns that in some African countries, the consumption of cheap sources of high-quality protein, vitamins, and minerals – such as eggs – remains low. The report will be launched on Wednesday, April 14, 2021. The Double Pyramid combines a health and climate pyramid that “serves as a guideline for daily food choices in enhancing people’s awareness and enriching their knowledge about the impacts of food choices to encourage dietary patterns that are healthy for humans and more sustainabl...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Climate Change Economy & Trade Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Source Type: news

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AbstractPurpose of reviewTo elucidate the intertwining of vascular events, vascular disease and vascular risk factors and COVID-19.Recent findingsStrokes are a leading cause of disability and death worldwide. Vascular risk factors are important drivers of strokes. There are unmodifiable vascular risk factors such as age and ethnicity and modifiable vascular risk factors. According to the INTERSTROKE study, the 10 most frequent modifiable vascular risk factors are arterial hypertension, physical inactivity, overweight, dyslipidaemia, smoking, unhealthy diet, cardiac pathologies, diabetes mellitus, stress/depression and over...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health care disparities Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs
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Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
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Metabolic syndrome may be the most common and serious condition you’ve never heard of. (At least that’s what I found out when I asked friends and relatives about it.) Worse, a study published recently in JAMA shows that it’s on the rise. Let’s start with the name, according to Merriam-Webster: Metabolic: Relating to the chemical changes in living cells by which energy is provided for vital processes and activities and new material is assimilated Syndrome: A group of signs and symptoms that occur together and characterize a particular abnormality or condition. So now you know what metabolic syndrome ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Diabetes Health Health care disparities Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cancer Health Health trends Heart Health Source Type: blogs
The coronavirus pandemic has changed a lot about modern American life: how we work, socialize, and even how we eat. Dining out is a distant memory. But nutritionally, people weren’t exactly thriving in pre-pandemic America. “Before COVID-19 came along, it was increasingly clear that the diet quality and nutritional status of Americans was terrible,” says Dr. Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. More than 40% of U.S. adults are obese. After years of declines, heart disease death rates are on the rise again. So are rates of obesity-linked canc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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