Inadequate Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella Immunity Among Employees

CONCLUSION: Given declines in immunizations during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is reason to be concerned that measles and varicella-associated morbidity and mortality may rise. Employers, especially those with large foreign-born populations or who require international travel may want to educate their populations about common contagious illnesses and offer immunity validation or vaccinations at no or low cost.PMID:33813919 | DOI:10.1177/21501327211005902
Source: Primary Care - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research

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Prevalences, nuances of presentation, and likely clinical course of myocarditis after use of some vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 are in sharper view after additions to the literature this week.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news
This article is licensed under aCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence.Mariana Rodriguez-Hakim, Linard R äz, Jan Vermant Some contagious diseases, such as COVID-19, spread through the transmission of aerosols and droplets. Aerosol and droplet formation occurs inside and outside of the respiratory tract, the latter being observed... The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry
Source: RSC - Soft Matter latest articles - Category: Chemistry Authors: Source Type: research
Abbott Laboratories has distributed more than 1.4 billion Covid-19 tests globally since the start of the pandemic, including around 300 million in the fourth quarter of 2021. Its global Covid-19 testing-related sales were $2.3 billion in the fourth quarter and $7.7 billion for the full year in 2021.
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: news
ConclusionsDuring the COVID-19 outbreak in 2020 there was a decline in all notified infectious diseases compared to the previous years, likely due to massive NPIs adoption, as well as, possibly, to decreased access to care and preventive services that caused difficulties to the surveillance system to detect notifiable infectious diseases. VCRs were still high for most important vaccines while there was a decline for other vaccines as evidence of the impact of the pandemic on vaccination activities.Key messagesNPIs had a deep impact on the reduction of airborne diseases.The decline for non-airborne infections is likely due ...
Source: The European Journal of Public Health - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021 Sep 3;70(35):1183-1190. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm7035a1.ABSTRACTThe Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that adolescents aged 11-12 years routinely receive tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap); meningococcal conjugate (MenACWY); and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Catch-up vaccination is recommended for hepatitis B (HepB); hepatitis A (HepA); measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR); and varicella (VAR) vaccines for adolescents whose childhood vaccinations are not current. Adolescents are also recommended to receive a booster dose of MenACWY vaccine at age...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
Vaccine uptake can greatly impact on the ability of a country or region to eliminate a disease, which could be detrimental to society if allowed free reign. A high vaccine coverage can produce herd immunity, which confers protection upon the unvaccinated individuals within the population. Although some countries take a voluntary approach to vaccination policies, other countries have mandatory vaccination for specific pathogens. There is a clear inverse correlation between vaccine uptake and incidence of disease and in many countries a trivalent vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella is included in the vaccination sched...
Source: Reviews in Medical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Tags: VIROLOGY Source Type: research
This study provides evidence for strengthening the infectious disease management policies in South Korea.
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
When does a pandemic end? Is it when life regains a semblance of normality? Is it when the world reaches herd immunity, the benchmark at which enough people are immune to an infectious disease to stop its widespread circulation? Or is it when the disease is defeated, the last patient cured and the pathogen retired to the history books? The last scenario, in the case of COVID-19, is likely a ways off, if it ever arrives. The virus has infected more than 100 million people worldwide and killed more than 2 million. New viral variants even more contagious than those that started the pandemic are spreading across the world. And...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Here’s betting you wouldn’t want anyone blowing smallpox scabs up your nose. But you might feel differently if you lived in 15th century China. Long ago, the Chinese recognized that people who had contracted smallpox once were immune to reinfection. They came up with the idea of preserving scabs from individuals who had suffered mild cases, drying them out, crushing them to a powder and blowing them up the nostril. For boys it was the right nostril, for girls it was the left because, well, 15th century. That is how the story of vaccines usually begins, though that version is decidedly incomplete. For one thing,...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer health Source Type: news
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