Pandemic Accentuates Need for Caribbean Countries to Improve Food and Nutrition Security

Jaxine Scott displays some vegetables in her backyard garden at her Kingston, Jamaica home. Credit: Kate ChappellBy Kate ChappellKINGSTON, Jamaica, Apr 2 2021 (IPS) Last year, Jaxine Scott was off work as a caregiver at a primary school as a result of the pandemic. One day, she noticed a green shoot emerging from some garlic in her fridge. She decided to plant it, and to her surprise, it thrived. “I thought ‘It looks like I have a green thumb, let me plant something else,’” Scott says. She now has a backyard garden, including cucumber, pumpkin, melon, callaloo, cantaloupe, pak choy and tomatoes. “It makes me feel good,” she says. “I can help my family members and neighbours. It has saved me money. I’m not going to stop, I’m going to continue,” she says. Scott, 45, is just one of thousands of Jamaicans who have found an interest in gardening, both as a way to pass the time and to become more self-sufficient when it comes to food and nutrition. This is a small yet important step for a country and region in which the trees are laden with an abundance of fruits, yet many people go hungry every day. An October, 2020 study of eight Caribbean countries found that 40% of people surveyed experienced some form of hunger, with 42% of those saying it was moderate to severe. The survey by the College of Health Sciences at the University of Technology included 2,257 households in eight countries across the region (Jamaica, Trinid...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: in the present study, nutritional status (SGA) and NRS 2002 were major mortality risk factors for CODIV-19 patients in the ICU.PMID:34538061 | DOI:10.20960/nh.03749
Source: Nutricion Hospitalaria - Category: Nutrition Authors: Source Type: research
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 2021 Sep 14. doi: 10.4081/monaldi.2021.1954. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTLike many developing countries, India was devastated by the raging pandemic of Covid 19. With the active involvement of the government and the community, the disaster was fought with. However, the impact was uneven across the country. The present study aimed to identify the factors responsible for variation in case burden of Covid-19. Data on demographic factors and co-morbidities were obtained from different sources available in the public domain. Descriptive statistics were used for comparison between states. A total of 30 ...
Source: Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Environ Res. 2021 Sep 9:112020. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2021.112020. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTSince the rise of the Covid-19 pandemic, several researchers stated the possibility of a positive relationship between Covid-19 spread and climatic parameters. An ecological study in 12 Iranian cities using the report of daily deaths from Covid-19 (March to August 2020) and validated data on air pollutants, considering average concentrations in each city in the last year used to analyze the association between chronic exposure to air pollutants and the death rate from Covid-19 in Iran. Poisson regression models were used, with ...
Source: Environmental Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: research
Virology. 2021 Sep 3;563:98-106. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2021.08.014. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe COVID-19 pandemic has paralyzed the global economy and resulted in millions of deaths globally. People with co-morbidities like obesity, diabetes and hypertension are at an increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness. This is of overwhelming concern because 42% of Americans are obese, 30% are pre-diabetic and 9.4% have clinical diabetes. Here, we investigated the effect of obesity on disease severity following SARS-CoV-2 infection using a well-established mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Diet-induced obese and lean contr...
Source: Virology - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Knowledge of COVID-19 hospital costs can aid in the development of a comprehensive approach for decision-making and planning for future risk management.PMID:34454894 | DOI:10.1016/j.bjid.2021.101609
Source: Braz J Infect Dis - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
In conclusion, cancer survivors, especially older individuals, demonstrate greater odds of and accelerated functional decline, suggesting that cancer and/or its treatment may alter aging trajectories. Linking Particulate Air Pollution and Dementia in a Small Region of the US https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/08/linking-particulate-air-pollution-and-dementia-in-a-small-region-of-the-us/ It is fairly settled that evident particulate air pollution, such as daily exposure to smoke from wood-fueled cooking fires, has a strongly detrimental effect on long-term health. The mechanisms involved are inflamm...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: A combination of underlying chronic conditions such as hypertension, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases together with altered ACE receptor expression, immune dysregulation via cytokine storm, alveolar and endothelial dysfunction, increased systemic coagulation may put individuals with diabetes at risk for COVID-19 severity. More studies are needed to elucidate how glucose-lowering drugs may modulate the host immune response in diabetic individuals, especially following the administration of potential COVID-19 vaccines.PMID:34365925 | DOI:10.2174/1573399817666210806104349
Source: Current Diabetes Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: research
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2021 Aug 6. doi: 10.1002/oby.23269. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTAt the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US, 42.5% of adults and 18.5% of children had obesity1,2 and less than 50% of the population met physical activity recommendations.3 Emerging evidence indicates that physical activity declined during the pandemic, likely due in part to school closures and restricted access to common indoor and outdoor places where people are active. Public health interventions are urgently needed to promote an active lifestyle and engagement in physical activity to mitigate the physical and mental adverse ...
Source: Obesity - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Source Type: research
IJERPH, Vol. 18, Pages 7814: Evaluation of Emergency First Response’s Competency in Undergraduate College Students: Enhancing Sustainable Medical Education in the Community for Work Occupational Safety International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph18157814 Authors: Graciano Dieck-Assad Omar Israel González Peña José Manuel Rodríguez-Delgado Worldwide, people’s quality of health has been decreasing due to bad eating habits that have generated an increase in diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, overweight, as well as an increase in...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
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