Here ’s What Will Actually Convince People to Get Vaccinated

One of evolution’s cleverest tricks was giving us a sense of shame. It’s a miserable feeling—low, humbling, publicly discomfiting—but it’s supposed to be: if you do something lousy you ought to feel something lousy, so you don’t do it again. In theory, when so many of the strategies for beating the COVID-19 pandemic depend on abiding by social distancing and other rules, shaming people who don’t ought to be a powerful way to bring us back in line. But increasingly, experts believe, the opposite is true. “The thinking has been that the more you shame people the more they will obey,” says Giovanni Travaglino, an assistant professor of social psychology at Kent University. “But this turns out to be absolutely wrong.” Last month, Travaglino and Chanki Moon, an assistant professor of psychology at Leeds Beckett University, published a paper in Frontiers in Psychology that threw the ineffectiveness of shaming into relief. They assembled nearly 1,900 people from the U.S., Italy and South Korea—choosing those countries on the basis of their differing sense of the collective culture, with the U.S. judged the most individualistic, South Korea the most group-oriented and Italy in between. The subjects were asked to rate how ashamed or guilty they’d feel if they contracted COVID-19. They were also asked to rate how often they obey guidelines like social distancing and how likely they’d be to tell friends...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Shreeram Akilesh, Cynthia C. Nast, Michifumi Yamashita, Kammi Henriksen, Vivek Charu, Megan L. Troxell, Neeraja Kambham, Erika Bracamonte, Donald Houghton, Naila I. Ahmed, Chyi Chyi Chong, Bijin Thajudeen, Shehzad Rehman, Firas Khoury, Jonathan E. Zuckerman, Jeremy Gitomer, Parthassarathy C. Raguram, Shanza Mujeeb, Ulrike Schwarze, M. Brendan Shannon
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Reumatología Clínica (English Edition)Author(s): Lina María Saldarriaga Rivera, Daniel Fernández Ávila, Wilson Bautista Molano, Daniel Jaramillo Arroyave, Alain Jasaf Bautista Ramírez, Adriana Díaz Maldonado, Jorge Hernán Izquierdo, Edwin Jáuregui, María Constanza Latorre Muñoz, Juan Pablo Restrepo, Juan Sebastián Segura Charry
Source: Reumatologia Clinica - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This single practice study showed total patient contact was similar over both sample periods, but most contact in 2020 was virtual. Further longitudinal multi-practice studies to confirm these findings and describe future consultation patterns are needed to inform general practice service delivery post-COVID-19. PMID: 33032304 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 October 2020Source: Academic RadiologyAuthor(s): Neo Poyiadji, Chad Klochko, Jeff LaForce, Manuel L. Brown, Brent Griffith
Source: Academic Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Curious what people think with pandemic and lack of away rotations.
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Radiation Oncology Source Type: forums
Publication date: 15 February 2021Source: Personality and Individual Differences, Volume 170Author(s): Brian W. Haas, Fumiko Hoeft, Kazufumi Omura
Source: Personality and Individual Differences - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Bonnie Crume
Source: Academic Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Conclusion: By underlining the gaps of knowledge and attitude towards breastfeeding of nurses working in NICUs, this study provides an insight into what needs to be improved, with the aim of promoting higher rates of breastfeeding in the preterm population.What is Known:•Breastfeeding is particularly challenging in the preterm population, despite its universally recognized health benefits.•Improving healthcare professionals ’ knowledge and attitude towards breastfeeding has been shown to be crucial for promoting breastfeeding in NICUs.What is New:•Our results provide useful insight into nurses ’ ...
Source: European Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Authors: Lam PT PMID: 33034296 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Hong Kong Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Hong Kong Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Neurología (English Edition)Author(s): M.J. Abenza-Abildúa, M.T. Ramírez-Prieto, R. Moreno-Zabaleta, N. Arenas-Valls, M.A. Salvador-Maya, C. Algarra-Lucas, B. Rojo Moreno-Arrones, B. Sánchez-Cordón, J. Ojeda-Ruíz de Luna, C. Jimeno-Montero, F.J. Navacerrada-Barrero, C. Borrue-Fernández, E. Malmierca-Corral, P. Ruíz-Seco, P. González-Ruano, I. Palmí-Cortés, J. Fernández-Travieso, M. Mata-Álvarez de Santullano, M.L. Almarcha-Menargues, G. Gutierrez-Gutierrez
Source: Neurologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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