Measles vaccine used as base for experimental COVID vaccine

Scientists developed a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine by adding a key coronavirus gene to the measles vaccine.
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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One Monday in late February 2020, Lauren Gardner was working frantically. The website she’d been managing around the clock for the last month—which tracked cases of an emerging respiratory disease called COVID-19, and presented the spread in maps and charts—was, all of a sudden, getting inundated with visitors and kept crashing. As Gardner, an associate professor of engineering at Johns Hopkins University (JHU), struggled to get the site online again, an official in the Trump Administration falsely claimed on Twitter that JHU had deliberately censored the information. “Seems like bad timing to sto...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news
Getting the kids ready to go back to school each fall is stressful enough in a normal year, never mind in the midst of a pandemic. Between the more transmissible Delta coronavirus variant, rising cases across the country and new masking guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there’s a lot for parents to navigate as they plan for schools to reopen this August and September. On the whole, experts seem to agree it’s time to get kids back into their classrooms. Remote learning set many children—especially students of color—back academically, cut them off from essential ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
The current pandemic of COVID-19 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) highlights an urgent need to develop a safe, efficacious, and durable vaccine. Using a measles virus (rMeV) vaccine strain as the backbone, we developed a series of recombinant attenuated vaccine candidates expressing various forms of the...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Microbiology, Coronavirus (COVID-19) Biological Sciences Source Type: research
2021 got off to a grim pandemic start in the U.S. A huge surge in COVID-19 cases followed the holiday season, peaking at around 300,000 new cases on Jan. 8, 2020. More than 20,000 Americans lost their lives to the virus in a single week in January alone and over 146,00 in total have died since the start of the year. But six weeks later, the picture looks more promising. New daily cases have fallen sharply, daily deaths have fallen to levels not seen since Thanksgiving, and the pace of vaccine roll-out is speeding up. These positive trends mean that we can now begin to ask what the endgame might look like. Would we be happy...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
In this study using different sources including serum, and monoclonal antibodies we established parameters for antibody extraction from the filter cards to assess antibody reactivity against Helicobacter pylori, measles virus (MV) and the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 antigens. We demonstrated that DBS and dried undiluted serum result in completely preserved antibody activity for immunoassays, including in virus neutralization assays against MV. Extraction efficiency was determined by IgG concentration measurements. The plaque-reduction neutralization titer 50% of dried human serum spots remained stable after more than 10-d...
Source: Journal of Immunological Methods - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: J Immunol Methods Source Type: research
o In the race for a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the synthetic mRNA format has been shown to be the fastest one and proved to be safe and highly efficient, even at the very low dose of a few µg per injection. The mRNA vaccines are not new: vaccines that are based on attenuated mRNA viruses, such as Mumps, Measles, and Rubella, immunize by delivering their mRNAs into the cells of the vaccinated individual, who produces the viral proteins that then prime the immune response. Synthetic mRNA in liposomes can be seen as a modern, more refined, and thereby a safer version of those live attenuated RNA viruses. The anti-C...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
There is a race between viral variants and vaccines – and for humanity’s sake the latter must winCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageNo one would blame Boris Johnson for wanting Covid-19 to be wiped out. The reality is that the disease is here to stay. New, more transmissible, variants have exposed the limits of trying to achieveherd immunity through vaccination. Sars-CoV-2 will be around for years. Virusesevolve usually into less deadlier forms. This time humanity faces a microscopic threat that has done the opposite. It is evolving to spread faster, infecting more people and clai...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Health policy Conservatives Boris Johnson Politics Infectious diseases Society Medical research Microbiology Rishi Sunak Source Type: news
When does a pandemic end? Is it when life regains a semblance of normality? Is it when the world reaches herd immunity, the benchmark at which enough people are immune to an infectious disease to stop its widespread circulation? Or is it when the disease is defeated, the last patient cured and the pathogen retired to the history books? The last scenario, in the case of COVID-19, is likely a ways off, if it ever arrives. The virus has infected more than 100 million people worldwide and killed more than 2 million. New viral variants even more contagious than those that started the pandemic are spreading across the world. And...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
The number of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients keeps rising in most of the European countries despite the pandemic precaution measures. The current antiviral and anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches are only supportive, have limited efficacy, and the prevention in reducing the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 virus is the best hope for public health. It is presumed that an effective vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 infection could mobilize the innate and adaptive immune responses and provide a protection against severe forms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease. As the ra...
Source: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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