Validation of the Rule of 7’s for Identifying Children at Low-risk for Lyme Meningitis

Conclusions: The Rule of 7’s accurately identified children with meningitis at low-risk for Lyme meningitis for whom clinicians should consider outpatient management while awaiting Lyme disease test results.
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research

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Conclusions: In children, NB more frequently presented as meningitis, and in adults in the form of Bannwarth’s syndrome. CSF pleocytosis in children with NB was higher than in adults, while the protein concentration in children was lower. Outcomes in children and adults were favorable and did not differ after standard NB treatment.
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
(CNN) — Health officials in Maine are warning about the potential for more cases of Powassan virus disease after one person was confirmed to be sick with the rare tick-borne illness, the first reported case in the state since 2017. The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday that a person in the southern part of the state had Powassan encephalitis, a severe disease that causes inflammation in the brain. The agency said the patient showed symptoms in late June and was hospitalized. The Maine CDC issued an advisory to physicians that more cases could be possible and suggested that doctors conside...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health CNN Maine news powassan virus ticks Source Type: news
Health officials have confirmed that an individual in Maine is sick with Powassan virus disease, marking the first time since 2017 that a person in the state has come down with the rare and serious tick-borne illness. The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday that a southern Maine resident was hospitalized for Powassan encephalitis—brain inflammation associated with the virus—after showing symptoms in late June. The announcement did not specify the individual’s current condition, but health officils doctors to stay vigilant about the potential spread of Powassan throughout th...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Maine onetime Source Type: news
Discussion Facial nerve palsy has been known for centuries, but in 1821 unilateral facial nerve paralysis was described by Sir Charles Bell. Bell’s palsy (BP) is a unilateral, acute facial paralysis that is clinically diagnosed after other etiologies have been excluded by appropriate history, physical examination and/or laboratory testing or imaging. Symptoms include abnormal movement of facial nerve. It can be associated with changes in facial sensation, hearing, taste or excessive tearing. The right and left sides are equally affected but bilateral BP is rare (0.3%). Paralysis can be complete or incomplete at prese...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Conclusions OCB are important biomarkers that can support MRI diagnostics and help to avoid false-positive MS diagnoses. Therefore, the revised McDonalds criteria have increased the importance of the OCB. New biomarkers such as AQP4 have now established themselves in clinical practice, and others such as Anti-MOG and NfL are about to enter clinical routine. An important focus in the search for new biomarkers is the monitoring of therapy efficacy and the prediction of severe side effects. Many other CSF molecules such as CHI3L1, IL-6, or CXCL13 show potential as markers for clinical practice, but further research is nee...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics, treatment, and outcome according to each etiology of pachymeningitis. We conducted a retrospective multicenter French nationwide study between 2000 and 2016 to describe the characteristics, outcome, and treatment of pachymeningitis. We included 60 patients (median age 55.5 years; interquartile range [IQR] 30–80, female/male ratio 0.43). Neurologic signs were present in 59 patients (98%) and consisted of headache in 43 (72%), cranial nerve palsy in 33 (55%), confusion in 10 (17%), seizures in 7 (12%), and focal neurologic signs in 9 (15%). Fever and weight ...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Observational Study Source Type: research
For most of us, springtime marks the return of life to a dreary landscape, bringing birdsong, trees in bud, and daffodils in bloom. But if you work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the coming of spring means the return of nasty diseases spread by ticks and mosquitoes. The killjoys at CDC celebrated the end of winter with a bummer of a paper showing that infections spread by ticks doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2016. (Tick populations have exploded in recent decades, perhaps due to climate change and loss of biodiversity.) Lyme disease The most common infection spread by ticks in the US i...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs
“Doesn’t it typically happen during the summer?” asked a worried lady that had walked into my clinic in November with a growing circular rash on her wrist. She was referring, of course, to Lyme disease, that scourge of outdoor enthusiasts. While the peak season for Lyme disease is indeed summer, the ticks that transmit it are active March through December. And, while this may be off-season for the ticks, it is a good time to catch up on how to stay safe in the not-so-distant spring. What is Lyme disease, and how do you treat it? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi which is sp...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Source Type: blogs
Abstract Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is an arbovirus induced by tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) transmitted by tick bite. The disease is rare in France (two to three cases per year) but endemic zones extend from Western Europe to the east coast of Asia (10,000-15,000 cases per year). An 8-year-old boy was admitted to our pediatric ward in Strasbourg (France) for febrile headache with diplopia. Four days after a tick bite, he declared a febrile headache together with maculopapular rash on the elbows, knees, and cheeks. Fourteen days after the outbreak of symptoms, he showed confusion, drowsiness, and binocul...
Source: Archives de Pediatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Arch Pediatr Source Type: research
We describe an HIV seroconversion syndrome presenting with facial diplegia and aseptic meningitis. DESCRIPTION: Patient is a 44 year old male with known uncontrolled hypertension. Three weeks prior to presentation he suffered a transient febrile illness while vacationing and was treated presumptively for malaria in Côte d’Ivoire. One week later, he experienced a migrainous headache with pronounced bucco-labial dysarthria, meningismus and dysguesia. Examination revealed hypertensive urgency, bilateral lower motor neuron (LMN) facial paralysis, and mild meningeal irritation. Initial investigations revealed renal ...
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: HIV/AIDS Source Type: research
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