UC plans to require vaccinations for incoming students starting in 2017

The University of California will require incoming students to be screened for tuberculosis and vaccinated for measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, meningococcus, tetanus and whooping cough under a plan set to take effect in 2017. Currently, the UC system only requires students to be vaccinated against hepatitis B, though several campuses have additional requirements. The plan — designed to help protect the health of students and campus communities — has been in the works for a year. But the need is more pressing than ever, given the current multistate measles outbreak and the re-emergence of other vaccine-preventable diseases among those not completely immunized. “I’m really excited that there’s support and momentum for this new immunization plan,” said Dr. Gina Fleming, medical director for the UC Student Health Insurance Plan. “We know that these preventive measures are effective.” Three-year phase-in The plan is being phased in over three years. The first phase focuses on building awareness among students about the upcoming requirement, with all fall 2015 incoming UC students receiving notification of the recommended vaccines and the process for making them mandatory. The intent of the plan is to set a baseline for all of UC, but does not prevent individual campuses from setting immunization standards for all students, or implementing the plan more rapidly. It was developed based on recommendations from the California Depar...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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Authors: Rombauts A, Abelenda-Alonso G, Cuervo G, Gudiol C, Carratalà J Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite adequate antibiotic coverage, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality worldwide. It induces both a local pulmonary and a systemic inflammatory response, particularly significant in severe cases. The intensity of the dysregulated host response varies from patient to patient and has a negative impact on survival and other outcomes. AREAS COVERED: This comprehensive review summarizes the pathophysiological aspects of the inflammatory response in CAP, brie...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Xyloglucan/gelose plus ORS was effective and safe in treating acute diarrhea in children. PMID: 33028102 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: Journal of Clinical and Experimental HepatologyAuthor(s): Pramod Kumar, Anand Kulkarni, Mithun Sharma, Padaki Nagaraja Rao
Source: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Authors: Tamai H, Shingaki N, Ida Y, Shimizu R, Maeshima S, Okamura J, Kawashima A, Nakao T, Hara T, Matsutani H, Nishikawa I, Higashi K Abstract BACKGROUND: Although clinical use of sofosbuvir plus ribavirin has been approved for patients infected with genotype 2 hepatitis C virus, patients ≥ 75-years-old have not been included in previous clinical trials. AIM: To evaluate the real-world safety and efficacy of sofosbuvir plus ribavirin for elderly patients (≥ 75-years-old) compared to nonelderly patients, we conducted a post-marketing prospective cohort study. METHODS: We treated 265 patients with ge...
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: DAAs are effective and safe in the treatment of recurrent HCV infection in LT recipients with history of HCC. Relapse to pre- and post-LT DAA therapy is associated with post-transplantation HCC recurrence. PMID: 33033569 [PubMed]
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Manuel Jorge Rial, Marcela Valverde, Victoria del Pozo, Francisco Javier González-Barcala, Carlos Martínez-Rivera, Xavier Muñoz, José María Olaguibel, Vicente Plaza, Elena Curto, Santiago Quirce, Pilar Barranco, Javier Domínguez-Ortega, Joaquin Mullol, César Picado, Antonio Valero, Irina Bobolea, Ebymar Arismendi, Paula Ribó, Joaquín Sastre
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Emergency-use authorizations, a formerly obscure corner of regulatory law, have become a centerpiece of the government ’s response to the pandemic.
Source: NYT - Category: American Health Authors: Tags: your-feed-science Coronavirus Risks and Safety Concerns Food and Drug Administration Hahn, Stephen M (1960- ) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Vaccination and Immunization Clinical Trials Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) your-feed-health your-feed-healthc Source Type: news
The use of an immune-system stimulant harvested from shark liver oil in the development of some coronavirus vaccines has animal conservationists pressing for alternatives.(Image credit: Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
Source: NPR Health and Science - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news
Authors: Yamaya T, Baba T, Hagiwara E, Ikeda S, Niwa T, Kitayama T, Murohashi K, Higa K, Sato Y, Ogura T Abstract Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been recognized as a worldwide pandemic. However, the clinical course of COVID-19 remains poorly characterized. Although some cases of pneumothorax have been reported, they all had pulmonary complications or were managed with mechanical ventilation. We herein report a case of pneumothorax that developed even though the patient had no pulmonary underlying diseases and had never been managed with mechanical ventilation. In the present case, a lung bulla was found on...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
Authors: Takahashi M, Horio Y, Takihara T, Enokida K, Miyaoka M, Hirabayashi K, Ohshinden K, Hattori S, Takahashi F, Takahashi G, Tanaka J, Takiguchi H, Niimi K, Ito Y, Hayama N, Oguma T, Asano K Abstract A 72-year-old man was treated with prednisolone and cyclosporine A for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A nodule with a diameter of 19 mm was found in the right lung and diagnosed as lung squamous cell carcinoma. Anti-cancer treatments were not performed because of the presence of advanced interstitial pneumonia and chronic respiratory failure. Cyclosporine A was tapered to avoid suppression of anti-tumor immunity, ...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
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