Imprisoned Saudi Activist and Other Rights Defenders Seek Justice in 2021

By Mandeep TiwanaNEW YORK, Jan 19 2021 (IPS) Two events generated significant interest and global solidarity in the final days of December 2020. A court in Saudi Arabia handed down a five years and eight months sentence to activist Loujain Al-Hathloul for publicly supporting women’s right to drive. Nicholas Opiyo, Ugandan human rights lawyer and defender of persecuted members of the LGBTQI community and political opponents of the president was arbitrarily detained on trumped up charges of ‘money laundering.’ Nicholas Opiyo was granted bail on 30 December following an outpouring of global support for his activism for justice. In handing out the verdict to Loujain Al-Hathloul, the court partly suspended her sentence raising hope that she might be released from prison in a couple of months due to time already served. As we await the release of Loujain Al-Hathloul and an end to judicial harassment of Nicholas Opiyo it’s notable that their struggles for justice are not unlike those of Sudha Bharadwaj, general secretary and voice of conscience of the People’s Union for Civil Liberties in Chhattisgarh, India or that of Teresita Naul, sixty-three year old committed advocate for health and social services in the Philippines. In Honduras, the Guapinol Water Defenders exposing harmful mining activities should have been receiving a national award. Instead, like Nicaraguan economic justice activist Maria Esperanza Sanchez Garcia and their fellow human rights...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Crime & Justice Democracy Economy & Trade Gender Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Labour LGBTQ Middle East & North Africa TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

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Steve Lindsay, a public health entomologist at Durham University, is midway through explaining how dogs might play a role in detecting COVID-19 infections when a decidedly less-well trained canine interrupts our conversation. “If you’ll excuse me for a minute, I’ve got a naughty black Labrador out in the back garden doing something it shouldn’t be doing,” Lindsay says. He disappears. I hear barking. He returns accompanied by a chocolate lab. “She’s not as skilled as the detection dogs,” Lindsay says as the pup tries to lick his face. “But it’s really interesting t...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
By GRACE CORDOVANO, DEVEN McGRAW, and AARON MIRI The HIPAA Privacy Rule gives patients the right to copies of their medical records, with rare exceptions. When patients need a copy of their medical records, most start the process by calling their doctor’s office and asking for how to get access. The receptionist or office staff point them in the right direction, whether it’s instructing them to write down their request and sending it to the office, pointing them to contact the medical records or radiology department (if the practice is large enough), or assisting them in setting up their patient ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Patients Aaron Miri Deven McGraw Grace Cordovano Health Data HIPAA Medical Records Source Type: blogs
ConclusionDuring COVID-19 pandemic, TIA and minor stroke consistently reduced compared to the same timeframe in 2019. Longer stroke-to-call and door-to-scan times, attributable to change in citizen behavior and screening at hospital arrival, did not impact on stroke-to-treatment time. Mothership model might have minimized the effects of the pandemic on the stroke care organization.
Source: Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Authors: Recker F, Weber E, Strizek B, Gembruch U, Seibel A Abstract In the current coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, certain patients are becoming seriously ill. Lung pathologies are common, and some patients even go on to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which requires intubation and artificial respiration of the critically ill patient. Imaging of the lung is absolutely necessary to obtain a diagnosis, assess the course of disease and for treatment. Particularly in gynecology and obstetrics (OBGYN), ultrasound scans of the lung can be a useful additional tool when caring for pregnant patients in...
Source: Geburtshilfe und Frauenheilkunde - Category: OBGYN Tags: Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd Source Type: research
As voiced by the late Congressman John Lewis, “The vote is the most powerful nonviolent tool we have to make change in a democratic society.” For health care professionals, it is also a powerful tool for helping our patients and their families make change in their communities. Together, we must empower our colleagues and patients to vote. Voting and health are inherently linked, as discussed by Gordon in his 2016 Academic Medicine article, “How Can Physicians Educate Patients About Health Care Policy Issues?” In this article, Gordon notes how voting is our primary means of selecting the governmen...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Featured Guest Perspective health equity patients voter moblization Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurposeTo determine the impact of the Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the volume, indications, and results of CT heads performed in the emergency department (ED) at Canadian tertiary academic centers in Ontario.MethodsA retrospective review of consecutive CT head examinations ordered through the ED during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada (March 12 –April 8, 2020) was performed and compared with that during the pre-COVID-19 period (February 12–March 10, 2020). CT reports were reviewed for the exam indication and the presence of predefined acute findings. A two-samplet t...
Source: Emergency Radiology - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
Daniel Griffin provides a clinical report on COVID-19, including a discussion of the role of vitamin D in COVID-19, Michael and Christopher explain why we have made all the wrong moves during the pandemic, evidence that the D614G amino acid change improves transmission in hamsters, and listener questions. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, and Brianne Barker Guests: Daniel Griffin, Michael B. Yaffe, and Christopher D. Barrett Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Regeneron CoV-2 mAb cocktail resu...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
The world’s attention turned to U.S. President Donald Trump on Friday, when we learned via his early morning tweet that he and First Lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19. That set off a whirlwind of events: Trump was given an infusion of an experimental drug—a monoclonal antibody “cocktail” that, while promising, has not been fully vetted. The President was hospitalized at Walter Reed. There, doctors administered the antiviral treatment Remdesivir. The chaotic, unexplained actions were not accompanied by any direct communication from Trump’s medical team, save for two very brief...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
As solutions like remote care are becoming the norm, 3D-printing disrupts the normal supply chain and even the number of life science studies on tools like artificial intelligence (A.I.) skyrocket, it’s become clear that we are not anticipating the digital health era; we are in the digital health era due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  First and foremost, it’s an era defined by a cultural transformation that will upend the traditional structure of healthcare. Clinical-grade sensors are available outside of the ivory towers of medicine; patients demand such tools so that they can become more proactive in mana...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Digital Health Research E-Patients Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy Personalized Medicine Security & Privacy Telemedicine & Smartphones amazon device epati Source Type: blogs
A pocket-sized ultrasound scanner powered by a smartphone performed comparably...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: COVID-19 patients more likely to have thromboembolism Lung ultrasound helps physicians manage COVID-19 Transcranial ultrasound helps solve COVID-19 mystery COVID-19 pandemic driving increase in ultrasound use Ultrasound correlates with COVID-19 severity, duration
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
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