Smoking Raises Risk for Deadly'Bleeding Strokes '

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2021 -- There's yet another reason to quit smoking: It increases the risk of deadly bleeding strokes, a new study warns. Researchers focused on a type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), which occurs when a blood...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Related Links:

Conclusion: Together with the clinical symptoms, the volume of bleeding, perihematomal edema (or their combined volume), and neurophysiological examinations like EEG and TMS play an important role in the neurological outcome of patients with ICH. This might affect the patients' rehabilitation plans in the future, since with the help of the examinations the subset of patients with potential for recovery could be identified.
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
AbstractWe investigated hospital admission rates for the entire spectrum of acute cerebrovascular diseases and of recanalization treatments for ischaemic stroke (IS) in the Austrian federal state of Styria during and also after the first coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) wave. We retrospectively identified all patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA), IS and non-traumatic intracranial haemorrhage (ICH; including intracerebral, subdural and subarachnoid bleeding types) admitted to one of the 11 public hospitals in Styria (covering  >  95% of inhospital cerebrovascular events in this region). Informa...
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion: Neutrophil extracellular trap formation following SAH originates in the ipsilateral SAS of the bleeding site and spreads gradually over time to basal, cortical, and periventricular areas in the parenchyma within 14days. Intravenous RNase application abrogates NET burden significantly in the brain parenchyma, underpinning a potential role in modulation of the innate immune activation after SAH.
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating stroke subtype with a high rate of mortality and morbidity. The poor clinical outcome can be attributed to the biphasic course of the disease: even if the patient survives the initial bleeding emergency, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) frequently follows within 2 weeks time and levies additional serious brain injury. Current therapeutic interventions do not specifically target the microvascular dysfunction underlying the ischemic event and as a consequence, provide only modest improvement in clinical outcome. SAH perturbs an extensive number of microvascular processes, includi...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
AbstractTo report our experience in treating one patient with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and concurrent acute ischemic stroke (AIS) due to large vessels occlusion (LVO). A man in his 50  s presented with acute right hemiparesis and aphasia. Brain CT showed a SAH in the left central sulcus; CT-angiography revealed a tandem occlusion of the left internal carotid artery and homolateral middle cerebral artery. He underwent an angiographic procedure with successful recanalization. Foll ow-up CT demonstrated a striatal-lenticular stroke without SAH progression. While the absolute contraindication to IVT duri...
Source: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
AbstractSubarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality, particularly within the first 72  h after aneurysm rupture. We recently found ultra-early cerebral thrombosis, detectable on T2* magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in a mouse SAH model at 4 h after onset. The current study examined whether such changes also occur in rat at 24 h after SAH, the vessels involved, whether the degree of thrombosis varied with SAH severity and brain injury, and if it differed between male and female rats. Adult Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to an endovascular perforation SAH m...
Source: Translational Stroke Research - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
An aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) can result in disability and high mortality.1 Re-bleeding, poor admission neurologic status, thick SAH, vasospasm, and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) are known as predicting factors for exacerbated prognosis of aSAH.2 –5 Similar to other cerebrovascular diseases, aSAH can causes a pronounced peripheral inflammatory/immune response. Systemic changes are also associated with outcomes of patients with SAH.6,7 Although the exact mechanism has not yet been fully revealed, inflammation is known to plays an important role in the progress of aSAH by inducing early brain damage, v...
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a type of stroke caused by usually bleeding in the subarachnoid space with high morbidity and mortality.1,2 The cause is usually arterial aneurysm rupture and arterial hypertension. SAH also affects cognitive functions. Half of the patients may return to their daily lives in a year after SAH, but most of these patients often have problems in memory, executive functions, and speech functions in the future.3 Although long-term neurological disorders are thought to be caused by late-term cerebral ischemia due to vasospasm triggered by extravascular blood contact with the arteries, the molecular basi...
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
(Boston Medical Center) New research led by investigators from Boston Medical Center and Grady Memorial Hospital demonstrates the significant decline in hospitalizations for neurological emergencies during the COVID-19 pandemic. The rate of Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) - bleeding in the space between the brain and the tissue covering the brain - hospitalizations declined 22.5 percent during the study period, which is consistent with the other reported decreases in emergencies such as stroke or heart attacks.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
AbstractPatients with hematological diseases often experience cerebrovascular complications including ischemic stroke, intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage, microbleeds, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, and dural sinus and cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT). In this update, we will review recent advances in the management of cerebrovascular diseases in the context of myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemias, lymphomas, multiple myeloma, POEMS, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), and sickle-cell disease. In acute ischemic stroke associated with hematological dis...
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
More News: Bleeding | General Medicine | Hemorrhagic Stroke | Smokers | Stroke | Study | Subarachnoid Hemorrhage