Alzheimer Disease: "Perhaps the Nose Knows: UPSIT and Alzheimer Disease"

My new column for NeurologyTimes.com: Perhaps the Nose Knows: UPSIT and Alzheimer DiseaseAnthony H. Risser, Ph.D.12 September 2014 Perhaps the Nose Knows
Source: BrainBlog - Category: Neurologists Source Type: blogs

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Source: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment Source Type: research
Authors: Ngoo QZ, Wan Hitam WH, Ab Razak A Abstract Objective: To study the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and visual electrophysiology testing in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods: A cross-sectional, hospital-based study: 25 AD subjects and 25 controls were recruited. Candidates who fulfil the criteria with normal ocular examinations were made to proceed with scanning laser polarimetry, pattern electroretinogram (PERG), and pattern visual evoked potential (PVEP) examinations of the right eye. RNFL thickness, PERG, and PVEP readings were evaluated. Results: In AD, the mean of avera...
Source: Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Tags: J Ophthalmol Source Type: research
This study provides strong evidence that following a healthy lifestyle can substantially extend the years a person lives disease-free." Commentary on Recent Evidence for Cognitive Decline to Precede Amyloid Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/commentary-on-recent-evidence-for-cognitive-decline-to-precede-amyloid-aggregation-in-alzheimers-disease/ I can't say that I think the data presented in the research noted here merits quite the degree of the attention that it has been given in the popular science press. It is interesting, but not compelling if its role...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The barrier between mind and body appears to be crumbling. Clinical practice and public perception need to catch upUnlikely as it may seem, #inflammation has become a hashtag. It seems to be everywhere suddenly, up to all sorts of tricks. Rather than simply being on our side, fighting infections and healing wounds, it turns out to have a dark side as well: the role it plays in causing us harm.It ’s now clear that inflammation is part of the problem in many, if not all, diseases of the body. And targeting immune or inflammatory causes of disease has led to a series of breakthroughs, from new treatments for rheumatoid ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Mental health Psychiatry Multiple sclerosis Depression Dementia Society Medical research Science UK news Alzheimer's Parkinson's disease Schizophrenia Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2020Source: The Lancet NeurologyAuthor(s): Frank Jessen, Rebecca E Amariglio, Rachel F Buckley, Wiesje M van der Flier, Ying Han, José Luis Molinuevo, Laura Rabin, Dorene M Rentz, Octavio Rodriguez-Gomez, Andrew J Saykin, Sietske A M Sikkes, Colette M Smart, Steffen Wolfsgruber, Michael WagnerSummaryA growing awareness about brain health and Alzheimer's disease in the general population is leading to an increasing number of cognitively unimpaired individuals, who are concerned that they have reduced cognitive function, to approach the medical system for help. The term su...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
We report that GFP-Aβ42 is sequestered and is selectively transported to vacuole for degradation and that autophagy is the prominent pathway for clearance of aggregates. Next, to identify genes that selectively promote the removal of Aβ42 aggregates, we screened levels of GFP-Aβ42 and non-aggregating GFP-Aβ42 (19:34) proteins in a panel of 192 autophagy mutants lacking genes involved in regulation and initiation of the pathway, cargo selection and degradation processes. The nutrient and stress signalling genes RRD1, SNF4, GCN4 and SSE1 were identified. Deletion of these genes impaired GFP-Aβ42 clea...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: 18 January 2020Source: New Scientist, Volume 245, Issue 3265Author(s): Alice Klein
Source: New Scientist - Category: Science Source Type: research
DEMENTIA is a progressive neurological condition that mainly affects people over the of 65, although it is not a natural part of ageing. Spotting the early warning signs is key to maintaining quality of life for as long as possible. A recent study suggests that Alzheimer ’s disease, the most common form of dementia, can be signalled by a change in your eyes.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Herring WJ, Ceesay P, Snyder E, Bliwise D, Budd K, Hutzelmann J, Stevens J, Lines C, Michelson D Abstract INTRODUCTION: We evaluated the clinical profile of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant for treating insomnia in patients with mild-to-moderate probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. METHODS: Randomized, double-blind, 4-week trial of suvorexant 10 mg (could be increased to 20 mg based on clinical response) or placebo in patients who met clinical diagnostic criteria for both probable AD dementia and insomnia. Sleep was assessed by overnight polysomnography in a sleep laboratory. The primar...
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research
Authors: Fossel M PMID: 31943780 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimers Dement Source Type: research
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