Lymphocyte cell population as a potential hematological index for early diagnosis of COVID-19.

In this study, we investigate the potential clinical utility of lymphocyte CPD for early diagnosis of COVID-19. To investigate the potential of lymphocyte cell population data (lymphocyte CPD) for use in early diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Lymphocyte CPD of healthy control (n = 51), common cold patients (n = 49) and mild COVID-19 patients (n = 126) were generated using hematology analyzer. The parameters were subjected to sensitivity and specificity analysis to determine their suitability as biomarkers for early diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Normality analysis showed that lymphocyte CPD followed a normal distribution. There were no significant differences in white blood cells (WBC) and lymphocyte (LY#) counts as well as the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) among the groups (p > 0.05). Lymphocyte volume standard deviation (LV-SD), lymphocyte conductivity standard deviation (LC-SD) and lymphocyte light scatter standard deviation (LS-SD) were significantly higher in the COVID-19 group than in common cold and control groups (p < 0.05). The corresponding mean lymphocyte light scattering  (MLS) was significantly reduced in the COVID-19 group, relative to the common cold group, but was significantly increased, when compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, there was no significant difference in mean lymphocyte volume (MLV) between the COVID-19 group and the common cold or control...
Source: Cellular and Molecular Biology - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand) Source Type: research

Related Links:

Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2021 Jul 6. doi: 10.1080/14787210.2021.1949986. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTINTRODUCTION: Seven coronavirus species have been identified that can infect humans. While human coronavirus infections had been historically associated with only mild respiratory symptoms similar to the common cold, three coronaviruses identified since 2003, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), cause life-threatening severe respiratory syndromes. The coronavirus disease 2019 (...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
We present here an overview of the virus interaction with the host and environment and anti-CoV therapeutic strategies; including vaccines and other methodologies, designed for prophylaxis and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection with the hope that this integrative analysis could help develop novel therapeutic approaches against COVID-19.
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
J Immunol. 2021 Apr 28:ji2001438. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.2001438. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTOver the last two decades, there have been three deadly human outbreaks of coronaviruses (CoVs) caused by SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and SARS-CoV-2, which has caused the current COVID-19 global pandemic. All three deadly CoVs originated from bats and transmitted to humans via various intermediate animal reservoirs. It remains highly possible that other global COVID pandemics will emerge in the coming years caused by yet another spillover of a bat-derived SARS-like coronavirus (SL-CoV) into humans. Determining the Ag and the human B cell...
Source: Journal of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Since the reporting of the first cases of coronavirus in China and the publication of the first sequence of SARS-CoV-2 in December 2019, the virus has undergone numerous mutations. In Europe, the spring outbreak (March –April) was followed by a drop in the number of cases and deaths. The disease may have evolved into a milder form. The increase in PCR-positive cases in late summer 2020 did not lead to the expected increase in hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and deaths, based on the severity of the disease in t he spring. This difference in disease severity could be due to factors independent of the virus or to the ...
Source: Nephron - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Viruses, Vol. 13, Pages 749: From Multiplex Serology to Serolomics—A Novel Approach to the Antibody Response Against the SARS-CoV-2 Proteome Viruses doi: 10.3390/v13050749 Authors: Julia Butt Rajagopal Murugan Theresa Hippchen Sylvia Olberg Monique van Straaten Hedda Wardemann Erec Stebbins Hans-Georg Kräusslich Ralf Bartenschlager Hermann Brenner Vibor Laketa Ben Schöttker Barbara Müller Uta Merle Tim Waterboer The emerging SARS-CoV-2 pandemic entails an urgent need for specific and sensitive high-throughput serological assays to assess SARS-CoV-2 epidemiology. We, ...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Conclusion: Due to the frequency of recombination events and the subsequent emergence of novel strains, HCoVs are be- coming more prevalent, making them a global health concern as they can lead to epidemics and pandemics. Understanding the epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and management of HCoVs is important, especially during this worldwide pandemic.Keywords: Coronavirus; common cold; severe respiratory disease; COVID-19.
Source: African Health Sciences - Category: African Health Authors: Source Type: research
The current Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, with more than 111 million reported cases and 2,500,000 deaths worldwide (mortality rate currently estimated at 2.2%), is a stark reminder that coronaviruses (CoV)-induced diseases remain a major threat to humanity. COVID-19 is only the latest case of betacoronavirus (β-CoV) epidemics/pandemics. In the last 20 years, two deadly CoV epidemics, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS; fatality rate 9.6%) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS; fatality rate 34.7%), plus the emergence of HCoV-HKU1 which causes the winter common cold (fatality rate 0.5%), were ...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Abstract SARS-CoV-2 virus was first identified in the beginning of 2020 and has spread all over the world, causing the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The virus is a member of the Coronavirus family, which includes viruses that cause common cold, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). MERS and SARS are known by causing adverse events in pregnancy. Considering that SARS-CoV-2 is a new infection agent, little is known about the risk of its infection to human embryo/fetal development. However, SARS and MERS were associated with negative outcomes, such as miscarriage...
Source: Genetics and Molecular Biology - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
As COVID-19 cases continue to rise, it is imperative to learn more about antibodies and T-cells produced against the causative virus, SARS-CoV-2, in order to guide the rapid development of therapies and vaccines. While much of the current antibody and vaccine research focuses on the receptor-binding domain of S1, a less-recognized opportunity is to harness the potential benefits of the more conserved S2 subunit. Similarities between the spike proteins of both SARS-CoV-2 and HIV-1 warrant exploring S2. Possible benefits of employing S2 in therapies and vaccines include the structural conservation of S2, extant cross-reactiv...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
There is frankly one question today on everybody’s mind: when will all this end? And although deep inside we all know this won’t really be over till it’s… over, we strive for a definite answer. Say, in June. The sad news is, the pandemic will be with us until we finally take individual responsibility. Instead of trying to avoid the jab, we should get ourselves vaccinated as soon as possible. Why? I’ll tell you in six simple, self-explanatory logical steps. 1. COVID-19 will end when the coronavirus becomes endemic A virus becomes endemic when it has a constant presence within a populatio...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Covid-19 Digital Health Research E-Patients Healthcare ethical vaccination coronavirus lockdown vaccine flu hospitals Italy Spanish flu Source Type: blogs
More News: Biology | Common Cold | Coronavirus | COVID-19 | Hematology | Molecular Biology | Pandemics | Respiratory Medicine | SARS | Study