Moderna ’s COVID-19 Vaccine Is 94.5% Effective. Here’s What That Really Means

It’s wasn’t a typical Sunday morning for Dr. Stephen Hoge, president of the biotech company Moderna, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. They were at their respective homes in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C., waiting to to be let into a Zoom call to hear the results of the very first COVID-19 vaccine that was tested in people. The hosts were members of the independent Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) that is reviewing data involving all the COVID-19 vaccine candidates supported by the U.S. government’s Operation Warp Speed program, and Hoge and Fauci were expecting the call to be about the first results from a vaccine Moderna and NIAID had developed together. With the pandemic continuing to infect record numbers of people around the world, a lot hinged on what the DSMB would say. The DSMB includes leading experts in the fields of infectious disease and vaccinology, as well as biostatisticians and ethicists, and is reviewing the first batches of study data for the first hints of efficacy. None of the people volunteering for the vaccine studies, nor the doctors running them, nor the companies sponsoring them, know what is being injected into the arms of the participants—half get an experimental COVID-19 vaccine, and half get a placebo placebo—so nobody knows if the vaccines being tested are working or not. Except the members of the DSMB. They are the only ones that can “unblind&...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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Prevalences, nuances of presentation, and likely clinical course of myocarditis after use of some vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 are in sharper view after additions to the literature this week.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
In the article “New treatments for chronic urticaria” by P Kolkhir et al (Ann Allergy Asthma Immunl 2020:124(1): 2-12), the following text has been removed. The article has been corrected online at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2019.08.014.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Technology is one of those items with which all clinicians (probably everyone) seem to have a love-hate relationship. The electronic medical record has made documenting and billing patient encounters much easier, yet at the same time, it seems to have erected a barrier between the patient and provider. Along with the growth of the electronic health record has been an explosion in the use of handheld devices and health-related applications (apps). These apps allow for more engagement and involvement with patients, including health monitoring by providers.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
We thank the respondents to our article1 for their insightful comments. Although we have matched subjects in both cohorts by age, sex, comorbidities, and index date, Lin et  al2 indicate a lack of adjustment for co-medication status, including the use of corticosteroids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), in the propensity score. We agree that these medications are important confounders on fracture. We therefore had conducted multivariate analysis in t he published article by adjustment for corticosteroids, DMARDs, and phototherapy.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
We read with great interest the article by Lin et  al1 reporting the association of incidental fractures in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). We appreciate the authors who collected data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database and conducted a great cohort study. Nevertheless, we highlight some key points.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This article is licensed under aCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence.Mariana Rodriguez-Hakim, Linard R äz, Jan Vermant Some contagious diseases, such as COVID-19, spread through the transmission of aerosols and droplets. Aerosol and droplet formation occurs inside and outside of the respiratory tract, the latter being observed... The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry
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