Coronavirus warning: 'Severe' measles outbreak is 'inevitable' after pandemic

COVID cases continue to rise in the UK and around the world. But scientists have now warned that the coronavirus pandemic may spark "inevitable" measles outbreaks next year due to the absence of vaccines. These are the signs and symptoms of measles that you should know about.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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One Monday in late February 2020, Lauren Gardner was working frantically. The website she’d been managing around the clock for the last month—which tracked cases of an emerging respiratory disease called COVID-19, and presented the spread in maps and charts—was, all of a sudden, getting inundated with visitors and kept crashing. As Gardner, an associate professor of engineering at Johns Hopkins University (JHU), struggled to get the site online again, an official in the Trump Administration falsely claimed on Twitter that JHU had deliberately censored the information. “Seems like bad timing to sto...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news
Getting the kids ready to go back to school each fall is stressful enough in a normal year, never mind in the midst of a pandemic. Between the more transmissible Delta coronavirus variant, rising cases across the country and new masking guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there’s a lot for parents to navigate as they plan for schools to reopen this August and September. On the whole, experts seem to agree it’s time to get kids back into their classrooms. Remote learning set many children—especially students of color—back academically, cut them off from essential ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2021 Aug;39(3):453-465. doi: 10.1016/j.emc.2021.04.002. Epub 2021 Jun 10.ABSTRACTThe role of the emergency provider lies at the forefront of recognition and treatment of novel and re-emerging infectious diseases in children. Familiarity with disease presentations that might be considered rare, such as vaccine-preventable and non-endemic illnesses, is essential in identifying and controlling outbreaks. As we have seen thus far in the novel coronavirus pandemic, susceptibility, severity, transmission, and disease presentation can all have unique patterns in children. Emergency providers also have the...
Source: The Medical Clinics of North America - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
2021 got off to a grim pandemic start in the U.S. A huge surge in COVID-19 cases followed the holiday season, peaking at around 300,000 new cases on Jan. 8, 2020. More than 20,000 Americans lost their lives to the virus in a single week in January alone and over 146,00 in total have died since the start of the year. But six weeks later, the picture looks more promising. New daily cases have fallen sharply, daily deaths have fallen to levels not seen since Thanksgiving, and the pace of vaccine roll-out is speeding up. These positive trends mean that we can now begin to ask what the endgame might look like. Would we be happy...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
When does a pandemic end? Is it when life regains a semblance of normality? Is it when the world reaches herd immunity, the benchmark at which enough people are immune to an infectious disease to stop its widespread circulation? Or is it when the disease is defeated, the last patient cured and the pathogen retired to the history books? The last scenario, in the case of COVID-19, is likely a ways off, if it ever arrives. The virus has infected more than 100 million people worldwide and killed more than 2 million. New viral variants even more contagious than those that started the pandemic are spreading across the world. And...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Since the global pandemic began, one of the grimmer features of daily life has been watching the coronavirus death count tick up and up as the months have gone by. With so much unnecessary death in 2020, it’s surprising that in many countries, at least according to preliminary numbers, there was one significant group that actually saw its death rates fall: children. Data from the Human Mortality Database, a research project run by a global team of demographers, suggest that COVID-19 did not reverse years-long declines in child mortality, despite a mortality surge in the general population. Demographers, pediatricians...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Marian L. TupyHumanity has suffered from deadly diseases for millennia without fully knowing what they were, how they were transmitted, or how they could be cured. Smallpox, which killed between 300 million and 500 million people in the 20th century alone, originated in either India or Egypt at least 3,000 years ago. But it was not until the late 18th century that the English physician Edward Jenner vaccinated his first patient against the disease. It took another two centuries before smallpox was finally eradicated in 1980. Similar stories can be told about other killer diseases. The fate of humanity, our ancestors t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion As governments assess how to contend with reaching effective levels of vaccination, they are preparing to tread carefully around vaccine skepticism while transparently and apolitically addressing common concerns about safety and due process. Attitudes could change as vaccines are distributed to the public and, hopefully, demonstrate safety and effectiveness, encouraging individuals to rapidly vaccinate. For government, a heavy-handed approach could backfire, fueling further anti-government/anti-science sentiment, but not pursuing vaccination with ample vigor could mean a prolonged timeline for co...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy COVID-19 vaccine Phillip Meylan Source Type: blogs
Authors: Kasstan B Abstract This commentary addresses the issue of vaccine hesitancy and decision-making among religious minority groups in high-income country settings. Recent measles outbreaks have been attributed to lower-level vaccination coverage among religious minorities, which has inspired targeted as well as wholesale public health interventions and legislation in a range of jurisdictions. The commentary takes the case of self-protective ethnic and religious minority groups, especially Haredi or 'ultra-Orthodox' Jews in the United Kingdom, to address two key aims. First, this commentary flags how damaging ...
Source: Anthropology and Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Anthropol Med Source Type: research
By Dr. Stephen A. Berger WHAT IS HERD IMMUNITY? It stands to reason that a contagious disease should disappear from a population when a sufficient percentage of potential victims – “the herd” has become immune. This outcome may arise because a massive number of individuals have been either infected or vaccinated. Most authorities dealing with COVID-19 have set the goal for herd immunity at>60 percent; however, the precise percentage for any infectious disease will depend on many factors involving demography, virulence, route of infection, etc.    HAS AN INFECTIOUS DISEASE EVER BEEN ERADICATE...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Epidemiology Examples News Source Type: blogs
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