Scientists Have Uncovered the Likely Cause of a Serious COVID-19 Symptom: Blood Clotting

One of the more surprising symptoms of COVID-19 has been the blood clots that many patients, including younger ones, have experienced with the infection. The clots have in some cases led to dangerous blockages in the lungs, caused strokes and even death, even in people without a history of circulatory conditions. In a paper published in Science earlier this week, researchers provide a glimpse into what may be driving the clots triggered by COVID-19 infection. The group found that a specific set of antibodies known as autoantibodies—which are rogue versions of cells meant to defend the body from pathogens, but instead attack its own cells (in this case the body’s own blood vessel cells)—may be partly responsible for the clotting risk associated with the disease. Among 172 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, they found that half produced these autoantibodies. In addition, when the scientists injected the autoantibodies into lab mice, the animals developed blood clots. In April, the same group of scientists reported that the inflammation associated with COVID-19 can lead to clots in small vessels in the lungs, and that these clots are mostly packed with an immune cell known as a neutrophil. In COVID-19 patients, these neutrophils can explode inside small blood vessels, creating sticky molecular traps that attract other clotting factors circulating in the blood. “Evolutionarily, we think these are meant to trap things like bacteria or viruses,” say...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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Authors: Sabet Sarvestani F, Azarpira N Abstract Heart and cerebral infarctions, as two important ischemic diseases, lead to the death of tissues due to inadequate blood supply and high mortality worldwide. These statuses are started via blockage of vessels and depletion of oxygen and nutrients which affected these areas. After reperfusion and restoration of oxygen supply, more severe injury was mediated by multifaceted cascades of inflammation and oxidative stress. microRNAs (miRNAs) as the regulator of biological and pathological pathways can adjust these conditions by interaction with their targets. Also, miRNAs...
Source: Immunological Investigations - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Immunol Invest Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Shreeram Akilesh, Cynthia C. Nast, Michifumi Yamashita, Kammi Henriksen, Vivek Charu, Megan L. Troxell, Neeraja Kambham, Erika Bracamonte, Donald Houghton, Naila I. Ahmed, Chyi Chyi Chong, Bijin Thajudeen, Shehzad Rehman, Firas Khoury, Jonathan E. Zuckerman, Jeremy Gitomer, Parthassarathy C. Raguram, Shanza Mujeeb, Ulrike Schwarze, M. Brendan Shannon
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Immunohistochemistry seems to be a promising option not only in clinical recognition, but also in the selection and monitoring of treatment effects. However, these methods have not yet recommended for routine clinical use. PMID: 33032462 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Scand J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic DisordersAuthor(s): N.G. Shah, B.C. Wible, J.A. Paulisi, M. Zaki, P. Lamparello, A. Sista, M. Sadek, G.R. Jacobowitz, T.S. Maldonado
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Reumatología Clínica (English Edition)Author(s): Lina María Saldarriaga Rivera, Daniel Fernández Ávila, Wilson Bautista Molano, Daniel Jaramillo Arroyave, Alain Jasaf Bautista Ramírez, Adriana Díaz Maldonado, Jorge Hernán Izquierdo, Edwin Jáuregui, María Constanza Latorre Muñoz, Juan Pablo Restrepo, Juan Sebastián Segura Charry
Source: Reumatologia Clinica - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This single practice study showed total patient contact was similar over both sample periods, but most contact in 2020 was virtual. Further longitudinal multi-practice studies to confirm these findings and describe future consultation patterns are needed to inform general practice service delivery post-COVID-19. PMID: 33032304 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 October 2020Source: Academic RadiologyAuthor(s): Neo Poyiadji, Chad Klochko, Jeff LaForce, Manuel L. Brown, Brent Griffith
Source: Academic Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Publication date: 15 February 2021Source: Personality and Individual Differences, Volume 170Author(s): Brian W. Haas, Fumiko Hoeft, Kazufumi Omura
Source: Personality and Individual Differences - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Authors: Lam PT PMID: 33034296 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Hong Kong Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Hong Kong Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: NeuropsychologiaAuthor(s): Erin L. Meier, Shannon M. Sheppard, Emily B. Goldberg, Catherine R. Head, Delaney M. Ubellacker, Alexandra Walker, Argye E. Hillis
Source: Neuropsychologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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