Scientists identify compound that stimulates muscle cells in mice

UCLA researchers have identified a compound that can reproduce the effect of exercise in muscle cells in mice. Thefindings are published in the journal Cell Reports Medicine.Normally, muscles get stronger as they are used, thanks to a series of chemical signals inside muscle cells. The newly identified compound activates those signals, which suggests that compounds like it could eventually be used to treat people with limb girdle muscular dystrophy, a form of adolescent-onset muscular dystrophy.When muscles aren ’t worked regularly, they gradually atrophy. (The phenomenon is familiar to anyone who’s had a cast on their leg for several weeks.) Fortunately, for people with healthy muscles, that deterioration is reversible. Muscle use stimulates chemical messengers inside the muscle cells that increase mus cle mass and strength.People with the muscle wasting disease limb girdle muscular dystrophy have a genetic defect that interferes with that chemical messenger, making their muscles unable to respond to exercise. No amount of exercise can trigger the signal to strengthen their muscles. Because the muscles never get the message, they gradually wither, and people with the disease end up in wheelchairs, almost completely paralyzed.“It’s really dramatic. When these patients lose muscle, they struggle to gain it back,” said Melissa Spencer, the paper’s senior author and a member of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of  Regenerative Medicine and ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

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ObjectiveMuscle inflammation is a feature in myositis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD ). Autoimmune mechanisms are thought to contribute to muscle weakness in patients with myositis. However, a lack of correlation between the extent of inflammatory cell infiltration and muscle weakness indicates that nonimmune pathologic mechanisms may play a role. The present study focused on 2 microRNA (miRNA ) sets previously identified as being elevated in the muscle of patients with DMD —an “inflammatory” miRNA set that is dampened with glucocorticoids, and a “dystrophin‐targeting” miRNA set that i...
Source: Arthritis and Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
In conclusion, our results suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby the canonical NF-κB cascade and a mitochondrial fission pathway interdependently regulate endothelial inflammation. Lin28 as a Target for Nerve Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/05/lin28-as-a-target-for-nerve-regeneration/ Researchers here show that the gene Lin28 regulates axon regrowth. In mice, raised levels of Lin28 produce greater regeneration of nerve injuries. Past research has investigated Lin28 from the standpoint of producing a more general improvement in regenerative capacity. It improves mitoch...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Follistatin is an inhibitor of myostatin. Blocking myostatin activity enhances muscle growth, with accompanying beneficial side-effects such as a loss of excess fat tissue. This is well proven. There are a good number of animal lineages (mice, dogs, cows, and so forth) resulting from natural or engineered myostatin loss of function mutations, and even a few well-muscled human individuals with similar mutations. A number of groups are at various stages in the development of therapies to either upregulate follistatin or inhibit myostatin. The latter is further along in the formal regulatory process: human trials have been co...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
AbstractObjectiveMuscle inflammation is a feature in myositis and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Autoimmune mechanisms are thought to contribute to myositis muscle weakness. However, the lack of correlation between inflammatory infiltrates and muscle weakness indicates a role for non ‐immune pathological mechanisms. We previously identified two microRNA sets elevated in DMD muscle. One is an “inflammatory” set that is dampened with glucocorticoids; the other is a “dystrophin‐targeting” set that inhibits dystrophin translation. Here we test the hypothesis that these m iRNAs are similarly dysr...
Source: Arthritis and Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: FULL LENGTH Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 3 January 2020Source: Plant ScienceAuthor(s): Juliana Cotabarren, Daniela Lufrano, Mónica Graciela Parisi, Walter David ObregónAbstractProtease inhibitors (PIs) are regulatory proteins found in numerous animal tissues and fluids, plants, and microorganisms that reduce and inhibit the exacerbated and uncontrolled activity of the target proteases. Specific PIs are also effective tools for inactivating proteases involved in human diseases like arthritis, pancreatitis, hepatitis, cancer, AIDS, thrombosis, emphysema, hypertension, and muscular dystrophy among others. Plant PIs&md...
Source: Plant Science - Category: Biology Source Type: research
This study demonstrates for the first time that senescent cells secrete functional LTs, significantly contributing to the LTs pool known to cause or exacerbate idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Against Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/against-senolytics/ There is no consensus in science that is so strong as to have no heretics. So here we have an interview with a naysayer on the matter of senolytic treatments, who argues that the loss of senescent cells in aged tissues will cause more harm to long-term health than the damage they will do by remaining. To be clear, I think this to be a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Discussion The mandible normally grows in a symmetric downward and forward movement relative to the skull base. The condyle is the primary growth center. “The mandible is unique in that its 2 joints and growth centers function together as a single unit.” It is the last bone in the body to reach skeletal maturity. The mandible and its growth are important for maxillary growth and therefore many problems that affect the mandible affect the facial and skulls structures as well. These growth problems can be relatively insidious and therefore may need monitoring over longer periods of time such as patients with unde...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Conclusion and Perspectives The IL-6/JAK/STAT signaling cascade plays a dominant role in skeletal muscle pathophysiology. IL-6 autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine functions assign to its downstream effectors pivotal importance in skeletal muscle-wasting-associated diseases and other multiple system diseases where muscle acts in communication with other organs. Targeting the components of the JAK/STAT pathway recently emerged as a strategic approach for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and human cancer. This review highlights the opposite outcomes on muscle biology caused by the amount of local and systemic release ...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
This study showed a good safety and tolerability profile of the studied substance (Monteleone et al., 2012). Since TGFβ has been described to induce the profibrogenetic response of fibroblasts, patients were monitored for 6 months with intestinal ultrasonography, not showing signs of intestinal stenosis. Moreover, half of the patients maintained remission during the 6 months follow up period (Zorzi et al., 2012). Afterwards, a randomized, double-blind, phase 2 study was conducted in CD patients with inflammatory lesions in the terminal ileum and/or right colon, with steroid-dependence/resistance, randomized to three ...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
ConclusionThe increased expression of IFN ‐inducible genes in muscle of JDM patients and their association with histological and clinical features further support the pathogenic role in JDM for both type I and type II IFNs.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Arthritis and Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Full Length Source Type: research
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