U.K. Plans ‘Challenge Trials,’ Which Will Intentionally Give People COVID-19 to Test Vaccines

On Oct. 20, researchers at the Imperial College of London announced plans for the first human challenge study of COVID-19, which involves deliberately infecting volunteers with the virus that causes the disease, in order to test the effectiveness of vaccines. The strategy is controversial, as researchers have to weigh the risks of infection against the benefits of learning how well the various vaccine candidates can fight that infection. The strongest argument in favor of the studies has to do with time. If cases of COVID-19 are waning, then the likelihood that people who are vaccinated would get exposed to and potentially infected with the virus naturally declines as well, and it takes researchers longer to accumulate enough data to tell if a vaccine is effective or not. By intentionally exposing people to the virus after they have been vaccinated, researchers can shrink this timeline significantly. Scientists have used the model to test vaccines against a number of different diseases, including the very first one against smallpox—Edward Jenner infected his son with cowpox, and then exposed his son to smallpox as a way to test his theory that exposure to the former would protect his son from infection by the latter. Scientists tested an H1N1 influenza vaccine by exposing people to the flu, and did the same with a cholera vaccine and the bacterium that causes it. But the strategy requires a solid base of information about both the disease and the vaccine in order to ju...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Shreeram Akilesh, Cynthia C. Nast, Michifumi Yamashita, Kammi Henriksen, Vivek Charu, Megan L. Troxell, Neeraja Kambham, Erika Bracamonte, Donald Houghton, Naila I. Ahmed, Chyi Chyi Chong, Bijin Thajudeen, Shehzad Rehman, Firas Khoury, Jonathan E. Zuckerman, Jeremy Gitomer, Parthassarathy C. Raguram, Shanza Mujeeb, Ulrike Schwarze, M. Brendan Shannon
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Reumatología Clínica (English Edition)Author(s): Lina María Saldarriaga Rivera, Daniel Fernández Ávila, Wilson Bautista Molano, Daniel Jaramillo Arroyave, Alain Jasaf Bautista Ramírez, Adriana Díaz Maldonado, Jorge Hernán Izquierdo, Edwin Jáuregui, María Constanza Latorre Muñoz, Juan Pablo Restrepo, Juan Sebastián Segura Charry
Source: Reumatologia Clinica - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This single practice study showed total patient contact was similar over both sample periods, but most contact in 2020 was virtual. Further longitudinal multi-practice studies to confirm these findings and describe future consultation patterns are needed to inform general practice service delivery post-COVID-19. PMID: 33032304 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 October 2020Source: Academic RadiologyAuthor(s): Neo Poyiadji, Chad Klochko, Jeff LaForce, Manuel L. Brown, Brent Griffith
Source: Academic Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Curious what people think with pandemic and lack of away rotations.
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Radiation Oncology Source Type: forums
Publication date: 15 February 2021Source: Personality and Individual Differences, Volume 170Author(s): Brian W. Haas, Fumiko Hoeft, Kazufumi Omura
Source: Personality and Individual Differences - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: Academic PediatricsAuthor(s): Bonnie Crume
Source: Academic Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Boosting the sensitivity of in vitroβ-lactam allergy diagnostic tests. Chem Commun (Camb). 2020 Oct 14;56(80):11973-11976 Authors: Peña-Mendizabal E, Morais S, Maquieira Á Abstract The synthesis of structurally new haptens and the development of suitable antigens are essential for boosting the sensitivity of drug allergy diagnostic testing. Unprecedented structural antigens for benzylpenicillin and amoxicillin are characterised and evaluated in a cohort of 70 subjects with a turnkey solution based on consumer electronics. PMID: 33033809 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Chemical Communications - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Chem Commun (Camb) Source Type: research
Authors: Hui KK PMID: 33034297 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Hong Kong Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Hong Kong Med J Source Type: research
Authors: Lam PT PMID: 33034296 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Hong Kong Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Hong Kong Med J Source Type: research
More News: Allergy | Allergy & Immunology | Cholera | Clinical Trials | Coronavirus | COVID-19 | Flu Pandemic | H1N1 | Infectious Diseases | Influenza | Influenza Vaccine | Learning | Medical Ethics | Men | Nurses | Nursing | Pandemics | SARS | Science | Smallpox | Smallpox Vaccine | Study | Swine Flu (H1N1) Vaccine | Universities & Medical Training | Vaccines | Zika Virus