Primary isolated hepatic tuberculosis mimicking small hepatocellular carcinoma: A case report

Rationale: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious threat in developing countries. Primary isolated hepatic tuberculosis is extremely rare. Because of its non-specific imaging features, noninvasive preoperative imaging diagnosis of isolated hepatic tuberculoma remains challenging. Patient concerns: A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due for suspected liver neoplasm during health examination. Diagnoses: The tests for blood, liver function, and tumor markers were within normal range. Preoperative ultrasonography (US) showed a hypoechoic lesion with a longitudinal diameter of 2.5 cm in segment six of liver. It exhibited early arterial phase hyperenhancement and late arterial phase rapid washout in contrast-enhanced US. It demonstrated hyperintensity in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and partly restricted diffusion in diffusion-weighted imaging. For this nodule, the preoperative diagnosis was small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interventions: Laparoscopic hepatectomy was performed. Intraoperative extensive adhesion in the abdominal cavity and liver was found. The lesion had undergone expansive growth. Outcomes: Microscopically, a granuloma with some necrosis was detected. With both acid-fast staining and TB fragment polymerase chain reaction showing positive results, TB was the final histology diagnosis. After surgery, the patient declined any anti-TB medication. During the follow-up, he had no symptoms. In the sixth month after sur...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research

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Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Adv Drug Deliv Rev Source Type: research
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Source: J Formos Med Assoc - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: J Formos Med Assoc Source Type: research
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Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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