Blount Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Under-recognized Association?

Background: Obesity is strongly associated with both Blount disease and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Obesity increases risks for anesthetic and postoperative complications, and OSA can further exacerbate these risks. Since children with Blount disease might have both conditions, we sought to determine the perioperative complications and the prevalence of OSA among these children. Methods: Patients younger than 18 years undergoing corrective surgery for Blount disease were identified from 2 sources as follows: a retrospective review of records at a single institution and querying of the Kids’ Inpatient Database, a nationally representative database. Results: At our institution, the prevalence of OSA among patients surgically treated for Blount disease was 23% (42/184). Blount patients were obese (100%), and predominately African American (89%), and male (68%). Patients were treated for OSA before surgery, and 2 patients (1%) had postoperative hypoxemia. In contrast, of 1059 cases of Blount disease from the Kids’ Inpatient Database, 3% were diagnosed with OSA. In total, 4.4% of all the Blount children experienced complications, including hypoxemia, respiratory insufficiency, atelectasis, and arrhythmias. Complications were associated with 4.3 additional days of hospitalization (P
Source: Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Knee Source Type: research

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Atrial fibrillation (afib) is a common heart rhythm disorder in which the upper chambers of the heart (the atria) beat fast and irregularly. Afib commonly causes recurrent symptoms, usually palpitations and shortness of breath, and can negatively affect quality of life. Afib also substantially increases the risk of stroke, and is also associated with heart failure, high blood pressure, and diabetes. People with afib routinely require lifelong treatment with blood thinners, to prevent blood clots that can lead to strokes. Doctors are only recently understanding the importance of lifestyle factors in treating afib. Modifiabl...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Exercise and Fitness Healthy Eating Heart Health Sleep Source Type: blogs
We describe the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies for AF management with a peek at some futuristic approaches. While each one of these variables could lend themselves for a separate review, we attempted to provide an overview of the most critical predictors of AF outcomes to equip the readers with the latest know-how of the management of AF.
Source: Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
This study supports a comprehensive approach to evaluation and treatment of mild OSA. While all people with mild OSA may not need to be treated with CPAP, there are patients who can greatly benefit from it. Treatments may be trial and error until you and your doctor get it right When sleep apnea is mild, treatment recommendations are less clear-cut, and should be determined based on the severity of your symptoms, your preferences, and other co-occurring health problems. Working in conjunction with your doctor, you can try a stepwise approach — if one treatment doesn’t work, you can stop that and try an alternat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Ear, nose, and throat Sleep Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
Tatjana PS Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with increased risk of death, stroke and heart failure. The prevalence and incidence of AF is increasing due to better overall medical treatment, longer survival and increasing incidence of cardiometabolic and lifestyle risk factors. Treatment of AF and AF-related complications significantly increase health-care costs. In addition, use of conventional rhythm control strategies (i.g. antiarrhyhtmic drugs and catheter-ablation) is associated with limited efficacy for sinus rhythm maintenance and serious adverse effe...
Source: Polish Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Kardiol Pol Source Type: research
The objective of this research article was to assess the trend of hospitalization, epidemiological characteristics and economic burden in the young adult, aged 18–45 years, presenting with atrial fibrillation.MethodsHospitalization data from the National Inpatient Sample between 2005 and 2015 were used to analyze prevalence of risk factors and financial burden in young adults with atrial fibrillation.ResultsFrom 2005 to 2015, a total of 260,080 admissions were included in the study. From 2005 to 2015, there was a decreasing trend of total admissions with atrial fibrillation among the age group of 18–45 years co...
Source: Heart and Lung: The Journal of Acute and Critical Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common chronic disease resulting from repetitive collapse of the airway during sleep, causing hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation. Untreated OSA at varying severity levels has been linked to hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, stroke, diabetes, decreased work performance, decreased quality of life (QOL), and increased all-cause mortality. It is a costly global health concern as the increasing prevalence of OSA parallels the rising rates of obesity. OSA affects approximately 22% of men and 17% of women, while severe OSA is present in 2-4% of the adult population1.
Source: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common chronic disease resulting from repetitive collapse of the airway during sleep, causing hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation. Untreated OSA at varying severity levels has been linked to hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, stroke, diabetes mellitus, decreased work performance, decreased quality of life, and increased all-cause mortality. OSA is a costly global health concern because the increasing prevalence of OSA has paralleled the increasing rates of obesity.
Source: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Resident corner Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundWe have previously demonstrated the feasibility of a nurse ‐led risk factor modification (RFM) program for improving weight loss and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) care among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients.ObjectiveWe now report its impact on arrhythmia outcomes in a subgroup of patients undergoing catheter ablation.MethodsParticipating patients with obesity and/or need for OSA management (high ‐risk per Berlin Questionnaire or untreated OSA) underwent in‐person consultation and monthly telephone calls with the nurse for up to 1 year. Arrhythmias were assessed by office ECGs and ≥2 wearable mon...
Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
AbstractHeart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is common in patients with adult congenital heart disease. Many of the most common congenital defects have a high prevalence of HFrEF, including left-sided obstructive lesions (aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, Shone complex), tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly, lesions in which there is a systemic right ventricle, and lesions palliated with a Fontan circulation. However, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is also prevalent in all these lesions. Comprehensive evaluation includes physical exam, biomarkers, echocardiography and advanc...
Source: Heart Failure Reviews - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Authors: Mukhopadhyay M, Roy S, Bera M, Bhattacharya G Abstract Sleep-related problems and obesity are steadily increasing due to sedentary lifestyle, intake of junk food, and certain genetic predisposition. Thus, the burden of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is elevated, and associated complications cause work-time loss, leading to an economic burden on the society. Early diagnosis can prevent several complications of OSA, and the condition can be corrected by stabilizing the glycemic status of an individual. Cardiovascular diseases, including various arrhythmias, arising due to OSA are previously described. Herein,...
Source: Current Cardiology Reviews - Category: Cardiology Tags: Curr Cardiol Rev Source Type: research
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