Report on a lactating patient with COVID-19

We report the first confirmed case of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in a lactating patient in Chizhou, Anhui Province, China. The lactating patient presented with intermittent fever for 16  days and cough for 10 days. Given her travel history to the epidemic area and the chest CT scan results, the patient was immediately admitted to the isolation ward of the Infectious Disease Department and breastfeeding was discontinued. Pharyngeal swab specimens tested positive for severe acute r espiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2, previously known as 2019-nCoV) in nucleic acid testing. During hospitalization, she also experienced bilateral breast tenderness. After active treatment, the patient ultimately achieved remission and was discharged from the hospital.Discussion and conclusionsSARS-CoV-2 is transmitted mainly through respiratory droplets and patient contact, rendering the general population to a high risk of infection. The management of mother –child interactions and breastfeeding in women with COVID-19 is a difficult problem. The purpose of this case report is to help clinicians by improving the understanding of COVID-19, particularly in lactating patients.
Source: Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19, SARS and MERS have significant detrimental effect on pregnancy. Rapid intervention, treatment, and intensive care support are essential for infected pregnant. Timely delivery is important in order to avoid intrauterine fetal death. PMID: 33015821 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
AbstractObjectivesWe aimed to test our hypothesis that additional administration of traditional Japanese (Kampo) medicine, kakkonto (kakkon-to: KT) and shosaikotokakikyosekko (sho-saiko-to-ka-kikyo-sekko: SSKKS), is more effective in relieving symptoms and preventing the onset of severe infection in mild-to-moderate COVID-19 patients compared to those treated only with conventional treatment.Trial designThe study is designed as a multi-center, interventional, parallel-group, randomized (1:1 ratio), investigator-sponsored, two-arm study.ParticipantsPatients and inpatients will be recruited from 8 Japanese academic and non-a...
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Abstract Interspecies transmissions of viruses between animals and humans may result in unpredictable pathogenic potential and new transmissible diseases. This mechanism has recently been exemplified by the discovery of new pathogenic viruses, such as the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, Middle-East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus epidemic in Saudi Arabia, and the deadly outbreak of Ebola in West Africa. The. SARS-CoV-2 causes coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), which is having a massive global impact in terms of economic disruption, and, above all, human health. The di...
Source: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS The epidemic prevention and control in Lu'an City has achieved phased results. Yet, new strict control measures need to be implemented to prevent a further outbreak, especially for those who will return to Lu'an City. PMID: 32796810 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
ai Wang A pneumonia outbreak caused by a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has spread around the world. A total of 2,314,621 laboratory-confirmed cases, including 157,847 deaths (6.8%) were reported globally by 20 April 2020. Common symptoms of COVID-19 pneumonia include fever, fatigue, and dry cough. Faced with such a sudden outbreak of emerging infectious disease, traditional models for predicting the peak of the epidemic often show inconsistent results. With the aim to timely judge the epidemic peak and provide support for decisions for resuming production and returning to normal life based on publicly reported data, ...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
The fall semester has yet to begin, but student athletes training for the season can already be found on college campuses across the U.S. And so can COVID-19. Since the start of July there have been at least two outbreaks among student athletes, coaches, and staff—with 37 infected at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Chapel Hill and 22 at Boise State. Clusters of infection have been traced to college town bars popular with students. A common misconception is that young people with COVID-19 don’t die and therefore college re-openings pose little risk. Sadly, this isn’t the case. COVID-19 deaths in the...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
In this study, therefore, we compared some clinical, demographic, and laboratory findings to determine the differences between H1N1 influenza and coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) to suggest the appropriate drug therapeutic approaches. Subsequent to the inclusion of 4 available studies, which presented all the required data, the findings and results were compared, showing fever and cough as the most prevalent clinical indications of both H1N1 influenza and 2019-nCoV diseases. With respect to the laboratory findings, both 2019-nCoV and H1N1 patients showed leukopenia as the main laboratory findings. Taken together, since ...
Source: Clinical Pulmonary Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Critical Care/Respiratory Care Source Type: research
ConclusionsThis report suggested that, in the early phase of COVID-19 pneumonia, routine screening could miss patients who were virus carriers. Highlighting travel history is of paramount importance for the early detection and isolation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 cases.
Source: Infectious Diseases of Poverty - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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