Immune cell activation in severe COVID-19 resembles lupus

(Emory Health Sciences) In severe cases of COVID-19, activation patterns of B cells resemble those seen in systemic lupus erythematosus, an autoimmune disease. Emory researchers want to see how far that resemblance extends.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Related Links:

Authors: Bonometti R, Sacchi MC, Stobbione P, Lauritano EC, Tamiazzo S, Marchegiani A, Novara E, Molinaro E, Benedetti I, Massone L, Bellora A, Boverio R Abstract Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory tract infection caused by a newly emergent coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. The acute phase may be followed by a second phase actually not yet completely understood but probably associated to an autoimmune activation. At the moment is not possible to clearly define an association between immunological findings and pathological symptoms, however, this case report describes the case of a patient who following COV...
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
ConclusionsLack of availability of sound scientific knowledge inevitably lead unreliable news to spread over the population, preventing people to disentangle them form reliable information. Even if additional studies are needed to replicate and strengthen our results, these findings represent initial evidence to derive recommendations based on actual data for subjects with autoimmune diseases.
Source: Autoimmunity Highlights - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
AbstractSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS ‐CoV‐2) infection causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) is the biggest pandemic of our lifetime to date. No effective treatment is yet in sight for this catastrophic illness. Several antiviral agents and vaccines are in clinical trials, and drug repurposings as immediate and alternative choices are also under consideration. Immunomodulatory agents like hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) as well as biological disease‐modifying anti‐rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) such as tocilizumab and anakinra received worldwide attention for treatment of critical patients with...
Source: International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: INVITED REVIEW Source Type: research
Authors: Gatto M, Perricone C, Tonello M, Bistoni O, Cattelan AM, Bursi R, Cafaro G, De Robertis E, Mencacci A, Bozza S, Vianello A, Iaccarino L, Gerli R, Doria A, Bartoloni E Abstract OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 features include disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombotic microangiopathy indicating a hypercoagulable state. We aimed to investigate antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) prevalence and clinical relationships in a large cohort of COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We analysed the prevalence and titres of serum aPL in 122 patients with COVID-19 and 157 with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS) and 91 wi...
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Abstract Chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) are derivatives of the heterocyclic aromatic compound quinoline. These economical compounds were used as antimalarial agents for many years. Currently, they are used as monotherapy or in conjunction with other therapies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). Based on its effects on the modulation of the autophagy process, various clinical studies suggest that CQ and HCQ could be used in combination with other chemo...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
As the world is severely affected by COVID-19 pandemic, the use of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine in prevention or for the treatment of patients is allowed in multiple countries but remained at the center of much controversy in recent days. This review describes the properties of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, and highlights not only their anti-viral effects but also their important immune-modulatory properties and their well-known use in autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus and arthritis. Chloroquine appears to inhibit in vitro SARS virus' replication and to interfere with SARS-CoV2 receptor (ACE2). Chlo...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
A man who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) five years ago sees his rheumatologist for a follow-up visit. Fortunately, his arthritis is well controlled through medication. He can walk and do all his daily activities without pain. But over the past six months, he’s been feeling short of breath when climbing stairs. He has an annoying dry cough, too. COVID-19? That’s ruled out quickly. But a CT scan of his chest reveals early fibrosis (scarring) of the lungs, most likely related to rheumatoid arthritis. “I can finally walk normally, and now I can’t breathe when I walk!” says the frust...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Arthritis Autoimmune diseases Health Inflammation Lung disease Source Type: blogs
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today that it is revoking the emergency use authorization for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, citing a lack of evidence that these drugs are effective for COVID-19. Early on in the pandemic, doctors scrambling to find a way to treat the disease widely prescribed hydroxychloroquine to their sickest patients, based on thin evidence from a handful of relatively weak studies. However, recent research has made it increasingly clear that the drug is likely ineffective against the disease, and that it carries a risk of significant side effects, including heart problems. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today that it is revoking the emergency use authorization for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, citing a lack of evidence that these drugs are effective for COVID-19. Early on in the pandemic, doctors scrambling to find a way to treat the disease widely prescribed hydroxychloroquine to their sickest patients, based on thin evidence from a handful of relatively weak studies. However, recent research has made it increasingly clear that the drug is likely ineffective against the disease, and that it carries a risk of significant side effects, including heart problems. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 incidence seems to be similar in our cohort compared to the general population. Adherence to therapy and to social distancing advise was high. PMID: 32527675 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Autoimmunity - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: J Autoimmun Source Type: research
More News: Autoimmune Disease | COVID-19 | Infectious Diseases | Lupus