Impact of Psychotropic Medication Effects on Obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome in People With Serious Mental Illness

People with serious mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder, have a higher mortality rate and shortened life expectancy. This is mainly attributable to physical diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Important risk factors for CVDs are obesity and other metabolic abnormalities, which are especially prevalent in people with SMI. Several factors contribute to this increased risk, including unhealthy lifestyles. Psychotropic medication independently further increases this risk. In this review we want to examine the relationship between obesity and other components of the metabolic syndrome and psychotropic medication in people with SMI.
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

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In conclusion, it remains unclear if brain-specific regional and temporal changes occur in the expression of the different APP variants during AD progression. Since APP is also found in blood cells, assessing the changes in APP mRNA expression in peripheral blood cells from AD patients has been considering an alternative. However, again the quantification of APP mRNA in peripheral blood cells has generated controversial results. Brain APP protein has been analyzed in only a few studies, probably as it is difficult to interpret the complex pattern of APP variants and fragments. We previously characterized the soluabl...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: Early recognition and accurate diagnosis of BD, which enables adequate and timely treatment, can improve outcomes. PMID: 32125440 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Der Nervenarzt - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Nervenarzt Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 September 2019Source: Neuroscience &Biobehavioral ReviewsAuthor(s): Gerwyn Morris, Basant K. Puri, Adam J. Walker, Michael Maes, Andre F. Carvalho, Ken Walder, Michael BerkAbstractActivated immune-inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways and consequent mitochondrial aberrations are involved in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders including major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. They offer independent and shared contributions to pathways underpinning medical comorbidities including insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, obesity and card...
Source: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
 In this episode of Inside Schizophrenia, our hosts tackle the topic of early onset – or childhood – schizophrenia. Host Rachel Star discusses her personal experiences with schizophrenia symptoms as an adolescent and Dr. Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich from Harvard Medical School discusses some of the latest research. Listen in now! About Our Guest Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich, MD is Director of the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Clinic at Boston Children’s Hospital and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School. He did his undergraduate and medical school at Johns Hopkins, his residency t...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Disorders Inside Schizophrenia Psychiatry Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Taken together, evidence from animal and human studies demonstrates that the brain detects levels of circulating nutrients and hormones and consequently organizes an outward response that contributes to the regulation of whole-body glucose homeostasis. However, there are major knowledge gaps about the exact nature of this response and its relative importance compared to peripheral processes. As we have seen, animal studies have provided an anatomical map of CNS glucose regulation and have identified important neurons and neural circuits involved. Additionally, the CNS sensing of key nutrients and hormones has b...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
This study presents findings from a large sample with extensive clinical phenotyping—allowing us to examine the relationships of insulin resistance with a number of key psychopathological, cognitive, and functioning measures, using multivariate methods to assess the relative contributions of different factors to metabolic abnormalities. PwS often have many risk factors for metabolic abnormalities: lifestyle habits, medications, and underlying biological mechanisms including inflammation and oxidative stress. Treatment and prevention of metabolic abnormalities in PwS can be particularly challenging due to these multip...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion: The present study revealed that VO2max and the sum of skinfolds were moderately related to depression scores, while VO2max was the only independent predictor of depression scores in female workers. Introduction Depression is a multifactorial disease that affects 322 million people worldwide (1). Between 2005 and 2015, there was an increase of more than 18% in the number of cases (1). The global prevalence is 4.4%, however, women suffer more from the disease, with 5.1% compared to 3.1% of men (1). In Brazil, depression affects 7.6% of the population, which represents about 11.2 million people, with a preva...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion The relationships between the potency of 5-HT2C blockade and hypertriglyceridemia and the potency of M3 blockade and glucose intolerance were shown in clinical setting. Receptor-binging profiles might be useful to estimate metabolic effect of antipsychotics-treatment. References Meyer JM, Davis VG, Goff DC, et al. Change in metabolic syndrome parameters with antipsychotic treatment in the CATIE Schizophrenia Trial: prospective data from phase 1. Schizophr Res. 2008;101: 273–286. Salvi V, Mencacci C, Barone-Adesi F. H1-histamine receptor affinity predicts weight gain with antidepressants. Eur Neuropsychoph...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Letters to the Editor Asenaprine clozapine olanzapine schizophrenia Source Type: research
Authors: Penninx BWJH, Lange SMM Abstract Psychiatric patients have a greater risk of premature mortality, predominantly due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Convincing evidence shows that psychiatric conditions are characterized by an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS), a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors including dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. This increased risk is present for a range of psychiatric conditions, including major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BD), schizophrenia, anxiety disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a...
Source: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Tags: Dialogues Clin Neurosci Source Type: research
Director chair, film slate and load horn. Here’s a proposal for you: If, by following the Wheat Belly lifestyle, a long list of conditions are reduced or reversed at no risk, almost no cost, reversing even chronic and potentially fatal conditions . . . does that mean that the notion of self-directed health might be on the horizon, i.e., putting control over health back in our own hands? I think it does. No, we will never implant our own defibrillators or take out our own gallbladders. But so many chronic health conditions afflicting modern humans recede that I believe that it is entirely reasonable to start talking a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle arthritis autoimmune diabetes eating disorder gluten grains Inflammation joint Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
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