Reply to Dr. Dahdah's Letter to the Editor Re: "A Four-Year-Old with History of Kawasaki Disease Presenting in Acute Shock".

Reply to Dr. Dahdah's Letter to the Editor Re: "A Four-Year-Old with History of Kawasaki Disease Presenting in Acute Shock". Prehosp Emerg Care. 2020 Oct 07;:1-2 Authors: Donofrio-Ödmann JJ, Remoulet A, Burns J, Harvey H, Staats K PMID: 33026275 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Prehospital Emergency Care - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Prehosp Emerg Care Source Type: research

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To test the hypothesis that cases of Kawasaki disease within a temporal cluster have a similar pattern of host response that is distinct from cases of Kawasaki disease in different observed clusters and randomly constructed clusters.
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
We thank Bassareo et al for their comments and agree that our community needs to come together to improve timely diagnosis and treatment of children with Kawasaki disease and KD like illnesses during the COVID-19 pandemic to prevent the development of coronary artery aneurysms (CAAs).
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research
Dr. Jane C. Burns has studied Kawasaki disease for four decades. It took only four months for COVID-19 to turn her life’s work upside down. Unusual numbers of children and teenagers living in COVID-19 hotspots like Lombardy, Italy and New York City have developed an inflammatory condition (officially called Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children, or MIS-C) that looks a lot like Kawasaki disease. In many cases, the children have also tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies, suggesting the syndrome followed a viral infection. In New York State, 170 inflammatory-disease cases and three related deaths are under in...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
(CNN) — The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is preparing to release an alert warning doctors to be on the lookout for a dangerous inflammatory syndrome in children that could be linked to coronavirus infection, a CDC spokesman told CNN Tuesday. The syndrome, marked by persistent fever, inflammation, poor function in one or more organs, and other symptoms similar to shock, was first reported by New York officials. More states began reporting diagnoses of the syndrome this week. An informal panel of pediatricians organized by Boston Children’s Hospital have dubbed the mysterious illness “Pedia...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Featured Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Boston Children's Hospital CNN Coronavirus Source Type: news
BOSTON (CBS) – It’s a mysterious and so far unexplained infection, affecting children in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. “This is a post viral response where the body’s immune system is causing persistent fevers and inflammation,” said Dr. Jeffrey Burns, chief of critical care at Boston’s Children’s Hospital. Burns said they are symptoms resemble Kawasaki disease and first started showing up weeks ago in young patients in European countries heavily impacted by covid-19 and New York where a health warning has been issued. “There’s no question we’re seeing ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Beth Germano Boston Children's Hospital Coronavirus Source Type: news
Due to “stay at home” orders and risk of COVID-19, many parents now hesitate or fear seeking in-person consultation for their children. This has led to reductions in emergency room visits and hospital admissions for other critical illnesses. Additionally, health care providers have focused on COVID-19 management during the pandemic. Because of Bayesian thinking, other diseases may be underdiagnosed or undergo delayed treatment.
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research
Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in Kawasaki disease, and patients with large or giant coronary aneurysms (z-score of ≥10 or absolute lumen diameter of ≥8 mm) are at greatest risk.1 For this reason, systemic anticoagulation together with antiplatelet therapy is recommended for all patients with Kawasaki disease with large/giant aneurysms.1 Even in the presence of therapeutic levels of anticoagulant medications and antiplatelet therapy, thrombosis in giant aneurysms can occur owing to unfavorable flow mechanics and decreased wall sheer stress in the aneurysm.
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
We present a case in which emergency medical services (EMS) intervened on a critically ill child with known giant coronary aneurysms as sequela to her severe complicated Kawasaki disease. This patient's severe shock ultimately ended in cardiac arrest and death. We discuss the keys to recognition, and critical importance to early intervention of pediatric shock in prehospital care. We also detail the cardiac ramifications of Kawasaki disease, steps for prompt identification of high risk complaints in these patients, and opportunities for treatment. PMID: 32250719 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Prehospital Emergency Care - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Prehosp Emerg Care Source Type: research
Background: Although an etiology of Kawasaki disease (KD) is unknown, an aberrant innate immune system in predisposed individuals has been proposed to play a key role in the development of KD vasculitis. Various etiological pathogens have been propo...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
Hamada H, Suzuki H, Onouchi Y, Ebata R, Terai M, Fuse S, et al. Efficacy of primary treatment with immunoglobulin plus ciclosporin for prevention of coronary artery abnormalities in patients with Kawasaki disease predicted to be at increased risk of non-response to intravenous immunoglobulin (KAICA): A randomized controlled, open-label blinded endpoints, phase 3 trial. Lancet 2019;393:1128-37.
Source: The Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Current Best Evidence Source Type: research
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