Does COVID-19 Imply an End to the Epoch of Science?

There is a deep mistrust not only of institutions and big business, but even of the medical establishment. One of the most worrying symptoms of this mistrust and disillusionment is the No Vax Movement. Credit: BigstockBy Daud Khan and Leila Yasmine KhanAMSTERDAM/ROME, Oct 8 2020 (IPS) Around the 16th century there was a radical shift in the way humans perceived nature.  New thinking in physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics heralded a deeper understanding of the world around us.  Between the 17th and 18th century this new thinking had resulted in spate of technological inventions such as the steam engine, railways, electricity and the telephone. Humans became masters of the world that surrounded us. Complemented with new institutional and financial innovations such the stock markets, banking and insurance this heralded in an unprecedented period of growth.   These scientific and technological changes were centred in Europe and subsequently in the USA. They not only transformed the daily life and work of people who lived there, but also led to a new mind-set. Science and Technology were held to be supreme and the custodians of scientific knowledge had a right, if not a duty, to rule the world.  With the underlying problems in the technology based model of development becoming apparent, many people in the advanced countries were themselves questioning the supremacy of science. Greater environmental awareness has also led to questions about the et...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Global Geopolitics Globalisation Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

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A new clinical trial will try to determine whether the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine can protect health care workers from being infected with COVID-19.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
FRIDAY, Sept. 4, 2020 -- A new clinical trial will try to determine whether the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine can protect health care workers from being infected with COVID-19. Hundreds of millions of people have received the MMR vaccine...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
By MICHEL ACCAD, MD With cases of COVID-19 either disappeared or rapidly diminishing from places like Wuhan, Italy, New York, and Sweden, many voices are speculating that herd immunity may have been reached in those areas and that it may be at hand in the remaining parts of the world that are still struggling with the pandemic.  Lockdowns should end—or may not have been needed to begin with, they conclude. Adding plausibility to their speculation is the discovery of biological evidence suggesting that prior exposure to other coronaviruses may confer some degree of immunity against SARS-CoV...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy immunity MICHEL ACCAD Pandemic Source Type: blogs
As the world reels from illnesses and deaths due to COVID-19, the race is on for a safe, effective, long-lasting vaccine to help the body block the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The three vaccine approaches discussed here are among the first to be tested clinically in the United States. How vaccines induce immunity: The starting line In 1796, in a pastoral corner of England, and during a far more feudal and ethically less enlightened time, Edward Jenner, an English country surgeon, inoculated James Phipps, his gardener’s eight-year-old son, with cowpox pustules obtained from the arm of a milkmaid. It was widely belie...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Health Infectious diseases Vaccines Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) The problem with the MMR, the measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine, is that the attack of the measles itself, according to virologists, requires your immune system’s full attention, so the other virus strains overwhelm the body, and the hyper-response or “adverse event” can be tragic. Combination vaccines, like the MMR, are highly experimental, unpredictable, and...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) A paper published by LSU Health New Orleans and Tulane University School of Medicine researchers suggests that live attenuated vaccines such as MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) may prevent the severe lung inflammation and sepsis associated with COVID-19 infection.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
(American Society for Microbiology) Administering the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine could serve as a preventive measure to dampen septic inflammation associated with COVID-19 infection, say a team of experts in this week's mBio, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Here’s betting you wouldn’t want anyone blowing smallpox scabs up your nose. But you might feel differently if you lived in 15th century China. Long ago, the Chinese recognized that people who had contracted smallpox once were immune to reinfection. They came up with the idea of preserving scabs from individuals who had suffered mild cases, drying them out, crushing them to a powder and blowing them up the nostril. For boys it was the right nostril, for girls it was the left because, well, 15th century. That is how the story of vaccines usually begins, though that version is decidedly incomplete. For one thing,...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer health Source Type: news
This article originally appeared on his blog here. The post The Problem With “Herd Immunity” as a COVID-19 Strategy appeared first on The Health Care Blog.
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Dave deBronkart e-Patient Dave e-Patient Dave DeBronkart Pandemic Source Type: blogs
Even before the pandemic, many parents rejected readily available, safe and effective immunizations that can protect their children.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Children and Childhood Parenting Measles Mumps Whooping Cough Freedom of Religion Source Type: news
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