Inversion Recovery Susceptibility Weighted Imaging With Enhanced T2 Weighting at 3 T Improves Visualization of Subpial Cortical Multiple Sclerosis Lesions

Objectives Cortical demyelination is common in multiple sclerosis (MS) and can be extensive. Cortical lesions contribute to disability independently from white matter lesions and may form via a distinct mechanism. However, current magnetic resonance imaging methods at 3 T are insensitive to cortical, and especially subpial cortical, lesions. Subpial lesions are well seen on T2*-weighted imaging at 7 T, but T2*-weighted methods on 3 T scanners are limited by poor lesion-to-cortex and cerebrospinal fluid-to-lesion contrast. We aimed to develop and evaluate a cerebrospinal fluid–suppressed, T2*-weighted sequence optimized for subpial cortical lesion visualization. Materials and Methods We developed a new magnetic resonance imaging sequence, inversion recovery susceptibility weighted imaging with enhanced T2 weighting (IR-SWIET; 0.8 mm × 0.8 mm in plane, 0.64 mm slice thickness with whole brain coverage, acquisition time ~5 minutes). We compared cortical lesion visualization independently on IR-SWIET (median signal from 4 acquisitions), magnetization-prepared 2 rapid acquisition gradient echoes (MP2RAGE), double inversion recovery (DIR), T2*-weighted segmented echo-planar imaging, and phase-sensitive inversion recovery images for 10 adults with MS. We also identified cortical lesions with a multicontrast reading of IR-SWIET (median of 2 acquisitions), MP2RAGE, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images for each case. Lesions identified on 3 T images w...
Source: Investigative Radiology - Category: Radiology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research

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ConclusionsAt very early clinical stages, mGCIPL thickness values were reduced without a concomitant peripapillary RNFL thinning. The longitudinal assessment demonstrated a RNFL loss in patients compared to HC, together with a plateau of mGCIPL thinning. A βlow subgroup of patients showed a reduction of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.
Source: Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
AbstractIn this independent, multicenter, post-marketing study, we directly compare induction immunosuppression versus escalation strategies on the risk of reaching the disability milestone of Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)  ≥ 6.0 over 10 years in previously untreated patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. We collected data of patients who started interferon beta (escalation) versus mitoxantrone or cyclophosphamide (induction) as initial treatment. Main eligibility criteria included an EDSS score  ≤ 4.0 at treatment start and either ≥ 2 relapses or 1 ...
Source: Neurotherapeutics - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 31 January 2020Source: Journal of NeuroradiologyAuthor(s): Jean-Christophe Brisset, Stephane Kremer, Salem Hannoun, Fabrice Bonneville, Francoise Durand-Dubief, Thomas Tourdias, Christian Barillot, Charles Guttmann, Sandra Vukusic, Vincent Dousset, Francois Cotton, for the Imaging Working Group of the “Observatoire Français de la Sclérose en Plaques” (OFSEP) and the OFSEP imaging groupAbstractPurpose: New multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), which exert beneficial effects through prevention of relapse, limitation of disability progression, ...
Source: Journal of Neuroradiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 December 2019Source: NeuroImageAuthor(s): Ferran Prados, Marcello Moccia, Aubrey Johnson, Marios Yiannakas, Francesco Grussu, Manuel Jorge Cardoso, Olga Ciccarelli, Sebastien Ourselin, Frederik Barkhof, Claudia Wheeler-KingshottAbstractSpinal cord atrophy measurements obtained from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are associated with disability in many neurological diseases and serve as in vivo biomarkers of neurodegeneration. Longitudinal spinal cord atrophy rate is commonly determined from the numerical difference between two volumes (based on 3D surface fitting) or two cr...
Source: NeuroImage - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 October 2019Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related DisordersAuthor(s): Anna M. Pietroboni, Francesca Schiano di Cola, Annalisa Colombi, Tiziana Carandini, Chiara Fenoglio, Laura Ghezzi, Milena A. De Riz, Fabio Triulzi, Elio Scarpini, Alessandro Padovani, Daniela GalimbertiAbstractBackgroundNeurodegeneration is present from the earliest stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) and is critically involved in MS related clinical disability. Aim of the present study was to assess the connection between amyloid burden and early cerebellar grey matter (GM) atrophy compared to early brain GM atrophy ...
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionThis is the first Egyptian study to show that infratentorial lesions, confluent brain lesions and T1 hypointense lesions are conventional MRI parameters that correlate with the degree of disability in Egyptian MS patients.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of fingolimod and teriflunomide in reducing disease activity in RRMS.MethodsThis multicenter, retrospective observational study was carried out with prospectively collected data from 15 centers. All consecutive RRMS patients treated with teriflunomide or fingolimod were included. Data for relapses, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were collected. Patients were matched using propensity scores.Annualized relapse rates (ARR), disability accumulation, percentage of patients with active MRI and treatment discon...
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
AbstractStudies comparing the effects of natalizumab and fingolimod in relapsing –remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) are limited. We aimed to compare natalizumab and fingolimod effects on clinical, neuropsychological, and MRI measures in RRMS patients after 2 years of treatment. RRMS patients starting natalizumab (n = 30) or fingolimod (n = 25) underwent neurologic, neuropsychological, and brain MRI assessments at baseline, month (M) 6, M12, and M24. Volumes of lesions, brain, gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and deep GM were measured. Fifteen healthy controls (HC) were also scan...
Source: Neurotherapeutics - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) can be prevented by undergoing routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tests, according to researchers from the Institute of Neurology in London. MS progression is difficult to predict as the disease manifests itself differently in every patient. In their study recently published in  Brain, the researchers ventured out to define the predictors of long-term disability outcomes by using clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), a first episode of neurological symptoms that can evolve into MS, as a baseline. They used MRI exams after a CIS diagnosis to anticipate the future of a patient ’s h...
Source: radRounds - Category: Radiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 23 July 2019Source: European Journal of RadiologyAuthor(s): Jialiang Fu, Xiaoya Chen, Yao Gu, Min Xie, Qiao Zheng, Jingjie Wang, Chun Zeng, Yongmei LiAbstractPurposeTo characterize the spatial patterns of functional connectivity(FC) changes of whole brain in RRMS with somatosensory disorder(RRMS-SS) and to investigate the correlation between abnormal FC and clinical scores.MethodsTwenty-six RRMS-SS patients and 23 healthy controls(HC) underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging(RS-fMRI) scanning. The clinical scores were collected including Expanded Disability Status Sco...
Source: European Journal of Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
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