Dietary protein intake and obesity-associated cardiometabolic function

Purpose of review High-protein intake is commonly recommended to help people manage body weight. However, high-protein intake could have adverse health consequences. Here we review the latest findings concerning the effect of high-protein intake on cardiometabolic health. Recent findings Calorie-reduced, high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets lower plasma glucose in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, when carbohydrate intake is not markedly reduced, high-protein intake often does not alter plasma glucose and increases insulin and glucagon concentrations, which are risk factors for T2D and ischemic heart disease. High-protein intake does not alter plasma triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations but promotes atherogenesis in animal models. The effect of high-protein intake on liver fat remains unclear. In population studies, high-protein intake is associated with increased risk for T2D, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and possibly cardiovascular diseases. Summary The relationship between protein intake and cardiometabolic health is complex and influenced by concomitant changes in body weight and overall diet composition. Although a high-protein, low-carbohydrate, reduced-energy diet can have beneficial effects on body weight and plasma glucose, habitual high-protein intake, without marked carbohydrate and energy restriction, is associated with increased cardiometabolic disease risk, presumably mediated by the changes in the hormonal milieu after high-protein...
Source: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care - Category: Nutrition Tags: NUTRITION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL FUNCTION: Edited by Annemie M.W.J. Schols and Labros S. Sidossis Source Type: research

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Obesity is a serious, chronic, treatable, and global disease epidemic. Over 98 million people currently have the disease of obesity, and in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Harvard researchers predicted that by 2030, 50% of the population in the United States will have the disease of obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is significantly associated with obesity. While many people with obesity do not have diabetes, most people with T2D have the disease of obesity. Excess adiposity (body fat storage), which is present in obesity, contributes to many chronic diseases beyond T2D. These include high blood pressure, he...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, TSF improved lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis by inducing the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway-mediated autophagy. Introduction Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a worldwide health concern due to the increased incidence of obesity and diabetes. In addition, NAFLD is closely associated with the risk factors of coronary heart disease, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia, which are considered to be the leading causes of death (Wiest et al., 2017). Although our understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD has significantly improved, there is still no effective medica...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
(CNN) — Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on Monday. After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had a 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news
Increasing Upstream Chromatin Long–Range Interactions May Favor Induction of Circular RNAs in LysoPC-Activated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Angus Li1,2†, Yu Sun1†, Charles Drummer IV1, Yifan Lu1, Daohai Yu3, Yan Zhou4, Xinyuan Li1, Simone J. Pearson1, Candice Johnson1, Catherine Yu5, William Y. Yang1, Kevin Mastascusa1, Xiaohua Jiang1, Jianxin Sun6, Thomas Rogers7, Wenhui Hu1, Hong Wang1 and Xiaofeng Yang1,7* 1Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
In conclusion, FGF21 belongs to a promising class of cytokines that are induced in response to stress and that can be used as a drug, drug target, or through a biomarker, depending on the physio-pathological context. All these findings will become clear when FGF21 will be used as a therapeutic molecule, exploiting the beneficial effects of FGF21 for treating metabolic disease or when it will be blocked to ameliorate disease progression and the onset of disease. Author Contributions CT and MS wrote the manuscript. VR contributed to the discussion. Funding This work was supported from the AFM-Telethon (19524), Italian Mi...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: The lipidome is altered in ART-treated HIV infection, and may contribute to inflammation and CVD progression. Detailed lipidomic analyses may better assess CVD risk in both HIV+ and HIV– individuals than does traditional lipid profiling. Introduction Both HIV infection and the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) contribute to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) (1, 2). Dyslipidemia is observed in HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals, and is associated with reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and elevated total (TC) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) chole...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our study shows that a higher burden of liver steatosis seems to be associated with less severe stroke and better functional outcome after ischemic stroke or TIA. Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of diseases from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis with varying degree of fibrosis, and liver cirrhosis (1, 2). NAFLD is becoming the most common chronic liver disease worldwide including Korea, affecting approximately 25% of the general population (3, 4). NAFLD is closely associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and is even recognized as ...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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