Pediatric COVID ‐19 case with regard to the family infection chain and the psychosocial context

The role of children in households, spreading SARS ‐CoV‐2, may differ from measles or influenza, and therefore, these diseases are not directly comparable to COVID‐19. The psychosocial aspect of infection and quarantine for families and children suggests that fear of social stigmatization can lead to not disclosing the infection AbstractThe role of children in households, spreading SARS ‐CoV‐2, may differ from measles or influenza, and therefore, these diseases are not directly comparable to COVID‐19. The psychosocial aspect of infection and quarantine for families and children suggests that fear of social stigmatization can lead to not disclosing the infection.
Source: Clinical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: CASE REPORT Source Type: research

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In this study, we aimed to decode molecular signatures and pathways of the host cells in response to SARS-CoV-2 and the rapid identification of repurposable drugs using bioinformatics and network biology strategies. We have analyzed available transcriptomic RNA-seq COVID-19 data to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). We detected 177 DEGs specific for COVID-19 where 122 were upregulated and 55 were downregulated compared to control (FDR
Source: European Journal of Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Eur J Pharmacol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The USMA experience mirrored what was occurring in the larger U.S. Army in the early 20th century and may serve as a model for the application of NPIs in response to modern infectious diseases resulting from novel or unknown etiologies. PMID: 32870979 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
Many months into the COVID-19 pandemic, the coronavirus is still spreading uncontrolled through the U.S. Public health authorities including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) tell us to remain six feet apart, wash our hands, disinfect frequently touched surfaces, and wear masks. But compliance with these measures—especially masks—is mixed, and daily we hear of cases where people do not know how they were infected. We hear about superspreading events, where one person infects many, happening in crowded bars and family gatherings, but not at outdoor ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
By MICHEL ACCAD, MD With cases of COVID-19 either disappeared or rapidly diminishing from places like Wuhan, Italy, New York, and Sweden, many voices are speculating that herd immunity may have been reached in those areas and that it may be at hand in the remaining parts of the world that are still struggling with the pandemic.  Lockdowns should end—or may not have been needed to begin with, they conclude. Adding plausibility to their speculation is the discovery of biological evidence suggesting that prior exposure to other coronaviruses may confer some degree of immunity against SARS-CoV...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy immunity MICHEL ACCAD Pandemic Source Type: blogs
As the world reels from illnesses and deaths due to COVID-19, the race is on for a safe, effective, long-lasting vaccine to help the body block the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The three vaccine approaches discussed here are among the first to be tested clinically in the United States. How vaccines induce immunity: The starting line In 1796, in a pastoral corner of England, and during a far more feudal and ethically less enlightened time, Edward Jenner, an English country surgeon, inoculated James Phipps, his gardener’s eight-year-old son, with cowpox pustules obtained from the arm of a milkmaid. It was widely belie...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Health Infectious diseases Vaccines Source Type: blogs
There is direct evidence for the spread of infectious diseases such as influenza, SARS, measles, and norovirus in locations where large groups of people gather at high densities e.g. theme parks, airports, etc. The mixing of susceptible and infectious indi...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Egress, Escape, Evacuation, Crowds Source Type: news
Authors: Elhusseiny KM, Abd-Elshahed Abd-Elhay F, Kamel MG Abstract INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has emerged in China. There are no available vaccines or antiviral drugs for COVID-19 patients. Herein, we represented possible therapeutic agents that may stand as a potential therapy against COVID-19. AREAS COVERED: We searched PubMed, Google Scholar, and clinicaltrials.gov for relevant papers. We showed some agents with potentially favorable efficacy, acceptable safety as well as good pharmacokinetic profiles. Several therapies are under assessment to evaluate their e...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
Here’s betting you wouldn’t want anyone blowing smallpox scabs up your nose. But you might feel differently if you lived in 15th century China. Long ago, the Chinese recognized that people who had contracted smallpox once were immune to reinfection. They came up with the idea of preserving scabs from individuals who had suffered mild cases, drying them out, crushing them to a powder and blowing them up the nostril. For boys it was the right nostril, for girls it was the left because, well, 15th century. That is how the story of vaccines usually begins, though that version is decidedly incomplete. For one thing,...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer health Source Type: news
This article originally appeared on The Bulwark here. The post The False Choice Between Science And Economics appeared first on The Health Care Blog.
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy David Shaywitz Source Type: blogs
ettil Viral outbreaks of varying frequencies and severities have caused panic and havoc across the globe throughout history. Influenza, small pox, measles, and yellow fever reverberated for centuries, causing huge burden for economies. The twenty-first century witnessed the most pathogenic and contagious virus outbreaks of zoonotic origin including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Ebola virus, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and Nipah virus. Nipah is considered one of the world’s deadliest viruses with the heaviest mortality rates in some instances. It is known...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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