Quick Hospitalization Linked to Worse Outcomes in COVID-19 Quick Hospitalization Linked to Worse Outcomes in COVID-19

Patients presenting within 3 days after symptom onset tended to be older and were more likely to have hypertension and chronic kidney disease than those admitted after 1 week.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

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AbstractPurposeDiabetic ’s patients are supposed to experience higher rates of COVID-19 related poor outcomes. We aimed to determine factors predicting poor outcomes in hospitalized diabetic patients with COVID-19.MethodsThis retrospective cohort study included all adult diabetic patients with radiological or laboratory confirmed COVID-19 who hospitalized between 20 February 2020 and 27 April 2020 in Alborz province, Iran. Data on demographic, medical history, and laboratory test at presentation were obtained from electronic medical records. Diagnosis of diabetes mellitus was self-reported. Comorbidities including ca...
Source: Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
(Penn State) A large, international study of COVID-19 patients confirmed that cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, stroke and cancer can increase a patient's risk of dying from the virus.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
by Mehrshad Sadria, Anita T. Layton Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) are frequently prescribed for a range of diseases including hypertension, proteinuric chronic kidney disease, and heart failure. There is evidence indicating that these drugs upregulate ACE2, a key component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and is found on the cells of a number of tissues, including the epithelial cells in the lungs. While ACE2 has a beneficial role in many diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, it also serves as a receptor for both SARS-CoV and ...
Source: PLoS Computational Biology - Category: Biology Authors: Source Type: research
Objective: We studied clinical outcomes of COVID-19 infection in patients living with HIV (PLH) in comparison to non-HIV population. Design: Analysis of a multicentre research network TriNETX was performed including patients more than 10 years of age diagnosed with COVID-19. Methods: Outcomes in COVID-19 positive patients with concurrent HIV (PLH) were compared with a propensity-matched cohort of patients without HIV (non-PLH). Results: Fifty thousand one hundred and sixty-seven patients with COVID-19 were identified (49,763 non-PLH, 404 PLH). PLH were more likely to be men, African–American, obese and hav...
Source: AIDS - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: FAST TRACK Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: The prevalence of kidney involvement during SARS-CoV-2 infection has been reported to be high. Nevertheless, data are lacking about the determinants of acute kidney injury (AKI) and the combined effect of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and AKI in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We collected data on patient demographics, comorbidities, chronic medications, vital signs, baseline laboratory test results and in-hospital treatment in patients with COVID-19 consecutively admitted to our Institution. Chronic kidney disease was defined as eGFR 
Source: Journal of Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: J Nephrol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: COVID-19 infection is associated with increased mortalit in chronic kidney diseases patients. Despite being non-significant, there was a trend towards increased mortality in patient with diabetes, D-dimer levels>1000 ugFEU/L and higher ferritin, prokalsitonin levels, increased CRP/albumin raio and lower neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio. PMID: 32950045 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Turkish Journal of Medical Sciences - Category: General Medicine Tags: Turk J Med Sci Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-COV-2 virus is a global pandemic impacting nearly 10 million people worldwide. Since the initial detection in December 2019, this novel coronavirus has posed major challenges to the human race. The disease has a varied spectrum of presentation with respiratory system being most commonly affected followed by the cardiovascular (CV) system in later stages of the disease.1 Multiple risk factors accounting for an adverse outcome include older age, male sex and presence of comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease and obesity.
Source: Heart and Lung - Category: Intensive Care Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Kang Y, Wang H, Chen H, Wang B, Yang Y, Zhao X, Ran Q, Wei J Abstract An 84-year-old woman with hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, and chronic kidney disease presented with fever and was diagnosed with corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19). During the hospitalization, she experienced unexpected sinus bradycardia with prolonged QTc, which was thought to be closely related to the short-term use of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an old drug used to treat malaria and autoimmune diseases, but now used against COVID-19. The cardiac side effects of HCQ were rare, seen with short-term and low-dose use. With the COVID-19...
Source: International Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Tags: Int Heart J Source Type: research
AbstractThe COronaVirus DISease 19 (COVID-19) is a pandemic infectious disease caused by the novel coronavirus Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome CoronaVirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Older age and presence of comorbidities, including diabetes, were shown to be associated with a more severe course and a higher fatality rate. Studies from the most affected countries, including China, United States and Italy, seem to indicate that prevalence of diabetes among patients affected by COVID-19 is not higher than that observed in the general population, thus suggesting that diabetes is not a risk factor for SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, a l...
Source: Acta Diabetologica - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Authors: Pramono LA Abstract The year of 2020 teaches us to prevent is always better than to cure. It is an old phrase that is being used for decades, but it is never been implemented cordially by our society nowadays. Covid-19 is a good lesson that reminds us to carefully prevent the spread of coronavirus which is now a pandemic worldwide. People now wash their hands more often and clean, wear a mask everywhere - everytime, do physical distancing, do healthy lifestyle such as physical activity, healthy diet, and consume multivitamins. They obey the cough and sneeze etiquette. Prevention awareness is never been suc...
Source: Acta medica Indonesiana - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Acta Med Indones Source Type: research
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