ACE2 expression in allergic airway disease may decrease the risk and severity of COVID-19

AbstractThe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is caused by Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and presents with respiratory symptoms which can be life threatening in severe cases. At the start of the pandemic, allergy, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were considered as risk factors for COVID-19 as they tend to exacerbate during respiratory viral infections. Recent literature has not shown that airway allergic diseases is a high-risk factor or that it increases the severity of COVID-19. This is due to a decrease in Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene expression in the nose and bronchial cells of allergic airway diseases. Conventional asthma treatment includes inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), allergen immunotherapy (AIT), and biologics, and should be continued as they might reduce the risks of asthmatics for coronavirus infection by enhancing antiviral defence and alleviating inflammation.
Source: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research

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Authors: Rombauts A, Abelenda-Alonso G, Cuervo G, Gudiol C, Carratalà J Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite adequate antibiotic coverage, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality worldwide. It induces both a local pulmonary and a systemic inflammatory response, particularly significant in severe cases. The intensity of the dysregulated host response varies from patient to patient and has a negative impact on survival and other outcomes. AREAS COVERED: This comprehensive review summarizes the pathophysiological aspects of the inflammatory response in CAP, brie...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
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Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Radiation Oncology Source Type: forums
The pandemic due to the infection by the betacoronavirus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which began in Wuhan, People ’s Republic of China, in December 2019, causing the infectious coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19),1 surpassed 21 million infections and more than 700,000 deaths globally,2 with numbers that continue to rise. The prognosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection worsens when comorbidities such as high blood press ure (HBP), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus (DM), cardiovascular disease, and obesity are associated.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory syndrome that emerged in the city of Wuhan and rapidly spread throughout the world causing a global pandemic.1 The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been identified as its causal agent.1 Factors such as older age or presence of comorbidities are frequently identified as variables with a negative effect on patients ’ prognosis.2 If we focus on the preexistent respiratory conditions, a higher risk of developing a severe infection has been reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory syndrome which emerged in the city of Wuhan and rapidly spread through the world causing a global pandemic1. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been identified as its causal agent1. Factors such as older age or presence of comorbidities are frequently identified as variables with a negative impact on patients ’ prognosis2. If we focus on pre-existent respiratory conditions, a higher risk of developing a severe infection has been reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease3.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Since the first case of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) on January 22, 2020, the number of positive cases and deaths has rapidly increased.(1) The initial report of 140 hospitalized coronavirus (COVID-19) infected patients from Wuhan China indicated that allergic disease, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were not risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection.(2) However, the clinical features of this condition with cough and shortness of breath might mask, or mimic, an asthma exacerbation.(3) Given the evolving nature of this pandemic, this initial summary may not represent the clinical...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
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