Lung Sonography in Obstetrics during COVID-19.

Lung Sonography in Obstetrics during COVID-19. Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd. 2020 Oct;80(10):1026-1032 Authors: Recker F, Weber E, Strizek B, Gembruch U, Seibel A Abstract In the current coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, certain patients are becoming seriously ill. Lung pathologies are common, and some patients even go on to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which requires intubation and artificial respiration of the critically ill patient. Imaging of the lung is absolutely necessary to obtain a diagnosis, assess the course of disease and for treatment. Particularly in gynecology and obstetrics (OBGYN), ultrasound scans of the lung can be a useful additional tool when caring for pregnant patients in the delivery room. As obstetricians use ultrasound imaging a lot in routine clinical practice, in the current pandemic setting, routine prenatal imaging screening could be expanded by the addition of ultrasound scans of the lung. Lung sonography can offer important additional information, particularly in obstetrics where the indications for radiation-emitting imaging are particularly restrictive. If there is a sonographic suspicion of lung involvement, then, depending on the symptoms and the morphological extent of the ultrasound findings, it may be necessary to consider admitting the patient to hospital for close fetal and maternal monitoring. PMID: 33012834 [PubMed]
Source: Geburtshilfe und Frauenheilkunde - Category: OBGYN Tags: Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd Source Type: research

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Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a global pandemic. The virus primarily affects the lungs where it induces respiratory distress syndrome ranging from mild to acute, however, there is a growing body of evidence supporting its negative effects on other system organs that also carry the ACE2 receptor, such as the placenta. The majority of newborns delivered from SARS-CoV-2 positive mothers test negative following delivery, suggesting that there are protective mechanisms within the placenta. There appears to be a higher incidence of pregna...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe financial and social impacts of Australia ’s public health restrictions have substantially affected families experiencing adversity, and their mental health. These impacts are likely to exacerbate inequities arising from adversity. To recover from COVID-19, policy investment should include income support and universal access to family hea lth services.
Source: PLoS One - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Basis Dis. 2021 Sep 2;1867(12):166264. doi: 10.1016/j.bbadis.2021.166264. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe molecular evolution of life on earth along with changing environmental, conditions has rendered mankind susceptible to endemic and pandemic emerging infectious diseases. The effects of certain systemic viral and bacterial infections on morbidity and mortality are considered as examples of recent emerging infections. Here we will focus on three examples of infections that are important in pregnancy and early childhood: SARS-CoV-2 virus, Zika virus, and Mycoplasma species. The basic structural ...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Source Type: research
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., August 25, 2021 – Johnson &Johnson today announced data supporting the use of its COVID-19 vaccine as a booster shot for people previously vaccinated with the single-shot Johnson &Johnson vaccine. In July, the Company reported interim Phase 1/2a data published in the New England Journal of Medicine that demonstrated neutralizing antibody responses generated by the Johnson &Johnson single-shot COVID-19 vaccine were strong and stable through eight months after immunization. In anticipation of the potential need for boosters, the Company conducted two Phase 1/2a studies in individuals pr...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news
Obstet Gynecol. 2021 Aug 9. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000004547. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTOBJECTIVE: To examine whether the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic altered risk of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes and whether there were differences by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection status among pregnant women.METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study using Epic's Cosmos research platform, women who delivered during the pandemic (March-December 2020) were compared with those who delivered prepandemic (matched months 2017-2019). Within the pandemic epoch, those who tested po...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen responsible for the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic. Because it is a new and highly contagious coronavirus, most people, especially pregnant women, lack immunity. It is therefore important to understand the interaction between why pregnant women are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 and the specific immune systems of pregnant women. Here, we provide an overview of the changes that occur in the immune system during pregnancy, the activation and response of the immune system in pregnant women with COVID-19, adverse pregnancy outcomes in ...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
ConclusionsThere is an increased risk of abortion in mothers with a positive test result of SARS-CoV-2, which several case reports and case series have identified during the pandemic. Placental inflammation during the viral infection may result in fetal growth retardation and induce abortion. There has not been any consistent evidence of vertical transmission of the virus from mother to fetus, which requires further investigation.
Source: PLoS One - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractStudy questionUnder deadly pandemic conditions involving the novel SARS-CoV –2 corona virus, could biopsied blastocysts be safely cryopreserved, stored and utilized for subsequent warming cycles?Summary answerBlastocysts were securely stored, effectively warmed and safely transferred to yield normal pregnancy outcomes under uncertain laboratory conditions subject to unprecedented policy changes.What is known alreadyBy April 2020, every IVF lab worldwide was implementing deep cleaning/disinfecting procedures in their laboratory and patient-contact areas, thorough hand-washing policies and mandatory PPE to redu...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract textA highly infectious novel coronavirus (now referred to as SARS-CoV-2) was first noted in December 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, and by March 11, 2020, was declared a global pandemic by the WHO. The widespread community transmission of a virus, new to our species, continues to raise urgent questions about implications for pregnant women and those considering conception. Almost immediately, international committees, including ASRM and ESHRE, drew up guidelines to protect the public and our patients. Across the globe, clinics were closed, patients turned away and questions regarding spread of the virus, s...
Source: Human Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Basis Dis. 2021 Jul 31:166231. doi: 10.1016/j.bbadis.2021.166231. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTOther than being a physiological process, pregnancy is a condition characterized by major adaptations of maternal endocrine and metabolic homeostasis that are necessary to accommodate the fetoplacental unit. Unfortunately, all these systemic, cellular, and molecular changes in maternal physiology also make the mother and the fetus more prone to adverse outcomes, including numerous alterations arising from viral infections. Common infections during pregnancy that have long been recognized as congenitally ...
Source: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Source Type: research
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