Measles, Chickenpox, and Other Preventable Diseases: Why Stricter Vaccine Exemptions Are a Must-Proposed Legislation For Stricter Vaccine Exemption Standards

Eleanor Sills (Florida State University), Measles, Chickenpox, and Other Preventable Diseases: Why Stricter Vaccine Exemptions Are a Must-Proposed Legislation For Stricter Vaccine Exemption Standards, 47 FL. ST. U. LAW REV. 3 (2020, FORTHCOMING): The outbreak of measles in 2019 was...
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - Category: Medical Law Authors: Source Type: blogs

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By MICHEL ACCAD, MD With cases of COVID-19 either disappeared or rapidly diminishing from places like Wuhan, Italy, New York, and Sweden, many voices are speculating that herd immunity may have been reached in those areas and that it may be at hand in the remaining parts of the world that are still struggling with the pandemic.  Lockdowns should end—or may not have been needed to begin with, they conclude. Adding plausibility to their speculation is the discovery of biological evidence suggesting that prior exposure to other coronaviruses may confer some degree of immunity against SARS-CoV...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy immunity MICHEL ACCAD Pandemic Source Type: blogs
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
This study explored how health is associated with legislative activity by examining whether outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, mumps, whooping cough and chickenpox, were associated with the introduction of legislation in states to change vaccine exemption laws.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Mark K. Slifka1* and Ian J. Amanna2 1Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health &Science University, Beaverton, OR, United States2Najít Technologies, Inc., Beaverton, OR, United States Vaccines play a vital role in protecting our communities against infectious disease. Unfortunately, some vaccines provide only partial protection or in some cases vaccine-mediated immunity may wane rapidly, resulting in either increased susceptibility to that disease or a requirement for more booster vaccinations in order to maintain immunity above a protective level. The durability of a...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling This is the time of year when it’s important to think about flu vaccinations. And there’s good reason for that! The flu causes thousands of preventable hospitalizations and deaths each year. But what about other vaccinations? Do you think of them as something for kids? You aren’t alone. And it’s true, a number of vaccinations are recommended for young children as well as preteens and teenagers. These vaccinations have provided an enormous benefit to public health by preventing diseases that were common and sometimes deadly in the past, including polio, rubella, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs
The co-author of this post is Will Schupmann President Trump's possible appointment of Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to lead a commission on vaccine safety should frighten all American parents. Kennedy, a vocal believer in the thoroughly discredited notion that childhood vaccines lead to autism, could strengthen the anti-vaccination movement, which would undoubtedly result in the deaths of unvaccinated children. Today's anti-vaccination movement has already proved to be dangerous. The Disneyland-linked outbreak of measles in California two years ago brought attention to a significant decline in vaccination rates, which vaccine o...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
By Stacy Simon It won’t be long before the new school year begins and students head back to the classroom - if they haven't already. Protect your children by making sure they are up to date with vaccinations. In fact, your state may require children entering school to be vaccinated against certain diseases. Check with your child’s doctor, your child’s school, or your health department to find out.Some diseases that are preventable through vaccines, such as whooping cough and chickenpox, are still common in the US. Thanks to vaccines, some other diseases are no longer common. But according to the Centers f...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Prevention/Early Detection Cervical Cancer Source Type: news
Rio de Janeiro is expecting about 500,000 visitors for the Olympic and Paralympic games this August. If you’re one of them, there are a few things you need to consider in order to have a safe, happy and healthy trip to Brazil this year.   1. Make sure you’re up to date on all your vaccines. This is travel safety 101. Infectious disease loves a crowd, and one way to make sure a nasty bug doesn't hitch a ride with you is to get vaccinated.  What to do:  Make an appointment with a travel doctor now to make sure you’re current on all your regular vaccines (measles, mumps, rubella, etc.) an...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
The chicken pox vaccine, formally known as the varicella vaccination, was added to the recommended childhood vaccination schedule in 1995. Prior to this vaccine’s creation, it was a common practice for families to expose children to others who had the chicken pox. The disease was considered a normal part of childhood and it was widely known that chicken pox in childhood posed little to no risk of serious harm. Risks associated with chicken pox are more common in adults and those with compromised immune systems. My Experience With The Chicken Pox Illness And Vaccination I clearly remember exposing my middle child to m...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Recent Articles chicken pox shingles truth about vaccines Varicella vaccine Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The mumps outbreak at Harvard medical school among vaccinated students is not shocking news. Informed readers know that vaccines do not provide safe, effective, lasting immunity against diseases. Merck’s own employees have accused their colleagues of falsifying data to promote their vaccine as a highly effective method of preventing the spread of mumps, a claim that is untrue. Meanwhile, Harvard and other institutions who receive funding from vaccine makers claim a disease is highly contagious, rather than blaming a vaccine that doesn’t work. References: http://www.naturalnews.com/053829_Harvard_mum...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Logical Missy Fluegge Top Stories Harvard mumps outbreak MMR vaccine truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs
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