ACE inhibitor/angiotensin II receptor blocker treatment and hemodynamic factors are associated with increased cardiac mRNA expression of ACE2 in patients with cardiovascular disease

ConclusionTreatment with ACEi/ARB is independently associated with an increased myocardial ACE2 mRNA expression in patients with coronary artery heart disease and in patients with end ‐stage heart failure. Further trials are needed to test whether this association is deleterious for patients with COVID‐19, or possibly protective. Nevertheless, hemodynamic factors seem to be equally important for regulation of cardiac ACE2 mRNA expression.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: European Journal of Heart Failure - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Shreeram Akilesh, Cynthia C. Nast, Michifumi Yamashita, Kammi Henriksen, Vivek Charu, Megan L. Troxell, Neeraja Kambham, Erika Bracamonte, Donald Houghton, Naila I. Ahmed, Chyi Chyi Chong, Bijin Thajudeen, Shehzad Rehman, Firas Khoury, Jonathan E. Zuckerman, Jeremy Gitomer, Parthassarathy C. Raguram, Shanza Mujeeb, Ulrike Schwarze, M. Brendan Shannon
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Reumatología Clínica (English Edition)Author(s): Lina María Saldarriaga Rivera, Daniel Fernández Ávila, Wilson Bautista Molano, Daniel Jaramillo Arroyave, Alain Jasaf Bautista Ramírez, Adriana Díaz Maldonado, Jorge Hernán Izquierdo, Edwin Jáuregui, María Constanza Latorre Muñoz, Juan Pablo Restrepo, Juan Sebastián Segura Charry
Source: Reumatologia Clinica - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This single practice study showed total patient contact was similar over both sample periods, but most contact in 2020 was virtual. Further longitudinal multi-practice studies to confirm these findings and describe future consultation patterns are needed to inform general practice service delivery post-COVID-19. PMID: 33032304 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 October 2020Source: Academic RadiologyAuthor(s): Neo Poyiadji, Chad Klochko, Jeff LaForce, Manuel L. Brown, Brent Griffith
Source: Academic Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Curious what people think with pandemic and lack of away rotations.
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Radiation Oncology Source Type: forums
Many fields of medicine are undergoing a transformation due to the COVID-19 pandemic, as patients are kept away from clinics as much as possible. Patients are now regularly visited by their doctors over video calls, are asked to perform certain proce...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Medicine Military Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs
This study is open label.Numbers to be randomized (sample size)For Group 1, a sample size of about 2000 SARS-CoV-2-exposed subjects such as household members and/or contacts of COVID-19 patients will take part in the study. Assuming around 1.5-2.0 asymptomatic household members and/or contacts for each COVID-19 patient, we expect to identify approximately 1000-1300 COVID-19 index cases to be randomized. An interim analysis on efficacy is planned using standard alpha-spending function.For Group 2, sufficient power for primary objective (negative swab within 14 days of randomization) will be reached given a sample size of 30...
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
AbstractTranscatheter interventions for structural heart disease (SHD) now represent an effective alternative to surgery in selected patients. A clear premise is that delay in or neglect of treating patients in need of SHD intervention is associated with unavoidable morbidity and mortality because many of them have life-threatening conditions. However, the recent outbreak of coronavirus-associated disease-2019 (COVID-19) is placing an unprecedented strain on patients, physicians and world healthcare systems that resulted in deferral of elective and semi-elective procedures, such as SHD, and delay in the treatment of patien...
Source: Current Atherosclerosis Reports - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Conclusion: This systematic review is aimed at summarizing all COVID-19 cases with a cardiac involvement published in paediatric age and trying to explain the underlying mechanisms responsible for COVID-19-related myocardial damage.What is Known:• Coronaviruses proved to be able to jump from animals to humans.• The outbreak of COVID-19 started from China (Dec 2019) and became pandemic.What is New:• Even in childhood, COVID-19 is not without the risk of cardiac involvement.• Myocarditis, heart failure, and arrhythmias are among the possible manifestations.
Source: European Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
This study is par for the course, looking at Japanese Olympic participants. Interestingly, it hints at the upper end of the dose-response curve for physical activity, in that a longer career as a professional athlete may be detrimental in comparison to lesser degrees of exercise and training. From this large, retrospective cohort study targeting 3546 Japanese Olympic athletes, we observed significant lower mortality among Olympians compared with the Japanese general population. The overall standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 0.29. The results were consistent with previous studies conducted in other non-Asian co...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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