The Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic: how does it spread and how do we stop it?

Purpose of review The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a global health threat associated with major socioeconomic disruptions. Understanding on the transmission characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 is crucial for optimizing preventive strategies. Recent findings SARS-CoV-2 can be transmitted efficiently between persons through respiratory droplets and direct and indirect contact. The significance of airborne droplet nuclei in SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the community setting is less clear. SARS-CoV-2 RNA and live viral particles may also be detected in other bodily fluids. Outbreaks have been reported in families, nursing homes, markets, restaurants, churches, shipping vessels, gyms, and healthcare facilities. Nonpharmaceutical preventive measures at both the community and individual levels are essential for reducing the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Summary Because well tolerated and effective vaccines for SARS-CoV-2 are unlikely to be widely available in the near future, there is an urgent need for finding other measures to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. With better understanding of its transmission characteristics, practical nonpharmaceutical preventive measures remain essential to reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission and its associated health and socioeconomic burdens.
Source: Current Opinion in HIV and AIDS - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: COVID19: Edited by Zhiwei Chen and Linqui Zhang Source Type: research

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Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Vaccines and immunisation Health Source Type: news
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Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
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Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
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Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Digital Health Health Workforce & Systems Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
This article is republished from The Conversation. Read the original article. The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Ignacio López-Goñi is microbiologist and works in University of Navarra (Spain). The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news
“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news
As 10-year-old Connor and a friend played one recent day at recess, they were approached by a group of boys wanting to play a game — testing the boys for coronavirus. Connor, who is half-Chinese, and his friend, also Chinese, played along at first, but Connor’s mother Nadia Alam tells TIME that they quickly became uncomfortable and that the other boys wouldn’t stop, she says. “In this instance, I honestly don’t think the kids who targeted my son acted out of malice,” Alam said in an emailed statement to TIME. “They were acting out the fear and ignorance around them. My son was upse...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV onetime Source Type: news
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