Improve patient safety support the name change of diabetes insipidus

We are supporting theThe Pituitary Foundation’s campaign to change the name of diabetes insipidus to‘pituitary insipidus - desmopressin dependent’ (PIDD).The term‘diabetes insipidus’ is very often mistaken for diabetes mellitus by health care professionals (HCPs) and the general public. Although both conditions share the term‘diabetes’, they are completely unrelated and mean very different things.The challenge for diabetes insipidus patients is when they need hospital attention (A&E, surgery, or on a hospital ward). Many HCPs are unaware of DI and assume the patient has diabetes mellitus. The consequences include inappropriate treatment being administered, which has resulted in fatalities.There seems to be little recognition that DI patients require desmopressin to avoid dehydration, or any fluid management (charts completed, catheter bags if needed, or sodium testing).The name change will prompt HCPs of exactly what the condition is, to understand it quickly so that patients are treated properly and safely.There is no need to die.Sign the petition to show your support.
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Related Links:

Conclusions: The identification of preanalytical factors that may negatively impact TDM is critical. Developing workflows that can standardize TDM practices, align appropriate timing and blood collection techniques, and specimen processing will eliminate errors.
Source: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Conclusions: A high serum CRP level on the initial day of TDM is an independent predictor of increasing vancomycin concentration-to-dose ratio in patients receiving intravenous vancomycin treatment, even if eGFR remains unchanged.
Source: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Conclusions: Individuals without a previous contralateral endarterectomy and/or history of diabetes are at lower risk of hemodynamic instability. The addition of computed tomography angiographic variables does not improve this prediction. Future prospective, randomized work is required to improve our ability to identify and treat individuals at high risk of instability during carotid angioplasty and stenting.
Source: Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Clinical Investigations Source Type: research
This case report demonstrates that using a non-approved long-acting GLP-1-RA (dulaglutide) in adolescents with T2D is possible and feasible under special circumstances when approved therapeutic options for the pediatric population fail to achieve adequate glycemic control. AbstractThis case report demonstrates that using a non-approved long-acting GLP-1-RA (dulaglutide) in adolescents with T2D is possible and feasible under special circumstances when approved therapeutic options for the pediatric population fail to achieve adequate glycemic control.
Source: Clinical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: CASE REPORT Source Type: research
AbstractAims/IntroductionWe aimed to study the relationships among the copper (Cu)/zinc (Zn) ratio, inflammatory biomarkers, and the prevalence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in patients with type 2 diabetes.Materials and MethodsWe performed a cross-sectional study on 651 patients with type 2 diabetes. DKD was defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g creatinine and/or an estimated glomerular filtration rate using cystatin C
Source: Journal of Diabetes Investigation - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
DIABETES SYMPTOMS are varied, and even the most subtle and surprising things can be signs of diabetes. But, do you know the signs in your mouth to look out for?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
AbstractA 4-year-old boy was referred to the nephrologist with daytime urinary incontinence and suspicion of an overactive bladder. At the age of 17  months he had been referred to the pediatric endocrinologist because of polyuria and polydipsia in order to exclude diabetes insipidus. Repeated water deprivation tests and a magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain were normal. Diabetes insipidus was excluded, and primary polydipsia was thoug ht to be most likely since diabetes mellitus also had been excluded. At the current presentation, he drank up to 3 L a day and quite often had wet diapers. He also seemed ...
Source: Pediatric Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
We report the case of a 43-year-old male with significant polyuria and polydipsia (>10 l/24 h) developed progressively over almost a year. Six months before admission in our department, uncontrolled type 2 DM was diagnosed and polyuria was interpreted as a result of his significant glycosuria. However, despite adequate sulfonylurea treatment with normalization of glycemic levels, polyuria persisted and even worsened. Upon admission, polyuria with a very low urine specific gravity and osmolality was noted (suggestive of increased water loss). A water deprivation test was performed and confirmed central diabetes...
Source: International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
We report a rare case of the concurrent manifestation of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A 56 year-old man was diagnosed as a type 2 DM on the basis of hyperglycemia with polyuria and polydipsia at a local clinic two months ago and started an oral hypoglycemic medication, but resulted in no symptomatic improvement at all. Upon admission to the university hospital, the patient's initial fasting blood sugar level was 140 mg/dL, and he showed polydipsic and polyuric conditions more than 8 L urine/day. Despite the hyperglycemia controlled with metformin and diet, his symptoms persisted. Furt...
Source: Electrolyte and Blood Pressure - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Electrolyte Blood Press Source Type: research
We report a rare case of the concurrent manifestation of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A 56 year-old man was diagnosed as a type 2 DM on the basis of hyperglycemia with polyuria and polydipsia at a local clinic two months ago and started an oral hypoglycemic medication, but resulted in no symptomatic improvement at all. Upon admission to the university hospital, the patient's initial fasting blood sugar level was 140 mg/dL, and he showed polydipsic and polyuric conditions more than 8 L urine/day. Despite the hyperglycemia controlled with metformin and diet, his symptoms persisted. Furt...
Source: Electrolyte and Blood Pressure - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Electrolyte Blood Press Source Type: research
More News: Bed Wetting | Diabetes | Diabetes Insipidus | Diabetes Mellitus | Endocrinology | Enuresis | Health Management | Hospitals | Sodium