Australia's 'no jab, no pay' rule has little effect on anti-vaxxer parents – study

Experts say the policy prompts people happy to vaccinate their children but doesn ’t work on those who oppose vaccination scienceAustralia ’s “no jab, no pay” policy has been associated with a drop in the number of children catching up on their first dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, suggesting the policy has had little impact on those who reject vaccination science.However, the policy was associated with more children catching up on their second dose of the vaccine and on their diphtheria –tetanus–pertussis vaccine, especially in lower socioeconomic status areas, the study published in the Medical Journal of Australia on Monday found.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Health Vaccines and immunisation Science Australia news Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: Linking family assistance payments with childhood vaccination status and associated program improvements were followed by substantial catch-up vaccination activity, particularly in young people from families of lower socio-economic status. PMID: 32951230 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Med J Aust - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Med J Aust Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Denmark has no general recommendations for vaccination of healthcare workers (HCWs). We explored the self-reported immunity to varicella, measles, mumps, and rubella, reasons for receiving the influenza vaccine or not, and opinions on vaccination of HCWs against varicella, MMR, pertussis, diphtheria, and influenza among staff from departments with a high risk of exposure to infectious agents. METHODS: From May 2019 to August 2019, a structured questionnaire was distributed to clinical and non-clinical HCWs at a tertiary and a general paediatric department in Denmark. Self-reported immunit...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
The objectives of this study were to assess the immunization coverage of children aged 5-6 years and 13-14 years during the 2017-2018 school year, and to identify sociodemographic factors associated with full immunization in these children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional school-based study was carried out. The population under study was a sample of schoolchildren aged 5-6 years and 13-14 years attending the second and 10th grades of primary and middle schools, respectively, located in the canton of Geneva, Switzerland. The data extracted from the vaccination cards included dates of administration...
Source: Archives de Pediatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Arch Pediatr Source Type: research
Conditions:   Pneumococcal Immunisation;   Diphtheria Immunisation;   Tetanus Immunisation;   Pertussis Immunisation;   Hepatitis B Immunisation;   Haemophilus Influenzae Type b Immunisation;   Polio Immunisation;   Measles Immunisation;   Rubella Immunisation;   Varicella Immunisation;   Mumps Immunisation Interventions:   Biological: SP0202-IIb Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine formulation 1;   Biological: SP0202-VI Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine formulation 2;   Biological: SP0202...
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Alex Nowrasteh andAndrew C. ForresterThe international spread of the SARS ‐​CoV‐​2 virus that causes the disease COVID-19 has prompted many governments to close their borders. Immigration policy plays an important role in limiting the international spread of contagious diseases.Prior to the COVID-19 crisis,several commentators were concerned that immigrants – especially illegal immigrants – were spreading serious diseases in the United States. This blog post is the first in a series to answer the question of whether immigrants spread serious notifiable diseases other than COVID-19 in the ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Right now, many people are hoping for a vaccine to protect against the new coronavirus. While that’s still on the horizon, new research suggests that families who do vaccinate their children may not be following the recommended schedule. Vaccines are given on a schedule for a reason: to protect children from vaccine-preventable disease. Experts designed the schedule so that children get protection when they need it — and the doses are timed so the vaccine itself can have the best effect. When parents don’t follow the schedule, their children may not be protected. And yet, many parents do not follow the sc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
Discussion and conclusion CCS’ offspring showed comparable to significantly higher participation levels of recommended vaccinations and screening examinations than their peers from the German general population. In contrast to the general population the attendance of CCS’ offspring did not decrease with rising age. CCS’ own experiences and increased worry about their children’s health may lead to a higher prevention awareness. This should be considered in counselling parents with a cancer history. Hintergrund Impfraten und Teilnahme an Vorsorgeuntersuchungen sind ein Indikator für das Bewusstse...
Source: Klinische Padiatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Authors: Albertsen N, Lynge AR, Skovgaard N, Olesen JS, Pedersen ML Abstract In order to estimate the current coverage rate among all children in Greenland, we conducted an observational cross-sectional study identifying all children in Greenland eligible for a vaccination between 1 March 2018 and 16 June 2019. we found an overall national coverage of 85.4%. The national coverage for the vaccinations given at birth was 97.1%, dropping to 94.3%, 87.7% and 83.6% at ages 3, 5 and 12 months. Among children eligible for the Measles, Mumps and Rubella-vaccinations, the national coverage was 76.9% for children aged 15 mon...
Source: International Journal of Circumpolar Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Int J Circumpolar Health Source Type: research
ConclusionsReceiving the birth dose is positively associated with up-to-date status later in childhood, highlighting the importance of starting vaccination early. The association is insensitive to confounding by factors observed in National Immunization Survey-Child, but investigation of unobserved factors such as vaccine hesitancy could provide critical information to guide intervention strategy.
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
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