Africa: Continent and Eastern Asia Doing Well to Contain Coronavirus

[Nyasa Times] The less developed world, particularly Africa and Eastern Asia, are doing much better in containing the COVID-19 pandemic than the developed countries, probably through their bitter experiences from Ebola and SARS outbreaks.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news

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By Stephen LeahySep 2 2020 (IPS-Partners) Having reported on SARS, Ebola, Bird Flu (H5N1) outbreaks, as well as writing about efforts to combat HIV, I was horrified by what was going on in Wuhan, China last Jan mainly because of how fast this new SARS-CoV-2 virus spread. By early Feb it seemed likely there’d be a global pandemic and by the end of Feb I started to freak out as the pandemic took hold. I’ve never been to Wuhan or China nor seen anyone who had; and I hadn’t travelled any where recently. It was nearly impossible for me to have encountered the virus but that didn’t keep me from getting si...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Health Humanitarian Emergencies Source Type: news
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news
Over the past few years, Professor Zhang Yongzhen has made it his business to sequence thousands of previously unknown viruses. But he knew straight away that this one was particularly nasty. It was about 1:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 that a metal box arrived at the drab, beige buildings that house the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. Inside was a test tube packed in dry ice that contained swabs from a patient suffering from a peculiar pneumonia sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan. But little did Zhang know that that box would also unleash a vicious squall of blame and geopolitical acrimony worthy of Pandora herself....
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news
AbstractThe most powerful lesson learned from the 2013-2016 outbreak of Ebola in West Africa was that we do not learn our lessons. A common sentiment at the time was that Ebola served as a “wake-up call”—an alarm which signalled that an outbreak of that magnitude should never have occurred and that we are ill-prepared globally to prevent and respond to them when they do. Pledges were made that we must learn from the outbreak before we were faced with another. Nearly five years l ater the world is in the grips of a pandemic of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that causes cor...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research
Abstract Interspecies transmissions of viruses between animals and humans may result in unpredictable pathogenic potential and new transmissible diseases. This mechanism has recently been exemplified by the discovery of new pathogenic viruses, such as the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, Middle-East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus epidemic in Saudi Arabia, and the deadly outbreak of Ebola in West Africa. The. SARS-CoV-2 causes coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), which is having a massive global impact in terms of economic disruption, and, above all, human health. The di...
Source: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Appl Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research
Authors: Xiong R, Zhang L, Li S, Sun Y, Ding M, Wang Y, Zhao Y, Wu Y, Shang W, Jiang X, Shan J, Shen Z, Tong Y, Xu L, Chen Y, Liu Y, Zou G, Lavillete D, Zhao Z, Wang R, Zhu L, Xiao G, Lan K, Li H, Xu K Abstract Emerging and re-emerging RNA viruses occasionally cause epidemics and pandemics worldwide, such as the on-going outbreak of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Herein, we identified two potent inhibitors of human DHODH, S312 and S416, with favorable drug-likeness and pharmacokinetic profiles, which all showed broad-spectrum antiviral effects against various RNA viruses, including influenza A virus, Zika virus,...
Source: Protein and Cell - Category: Cytology Tags: Protein Cell Source Type: research
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Ongoing destruction of nature will result in stream of animal diseases jumping to humans, says reportCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe world is treating the health and economic symptoms of the coronavirus pandemic but not the environmental cause, according to the authors of aUN report. As a result, a steady stream of diseases can be expected to jump from animals to humans in coming years, they say.The number of such“zoonotic” epidemics is rising, from Ebola to Sars to West Nile virus and Rift Valley fever, with the root cause being the destruction of nature by humans and the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Environment Wildlife Infectious diseases Farming Medical research Science World news United Nations Health Sars Meat industry Farm animals Source Type: news
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