Risk of COVID-19-related death among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma prescribed inhaled corticosteroids: an observational cohort study using the OpenSAFELY platform

Summary Background Early descriptions of patients admitted to hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic showed a lower prevalence of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than would be expected for an acute respiratory disease like COVID-19, leading to speculation that inhaled corticosteroi ds (ICSs) might protect against infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 or the development of serious sequelae. We assessed the association between ICS and COVID-19-related death among people with COPD or asthma using linked electronic health records (EHRs) in England, UK. Me thods In this observational study, we analysed patient-level data for people with COPD or asthma from primary care EHRs linked with death data from the Office of National Statistics using the OpenSAFELY platform. The index date (start of follow-up) for both cohorts was March 1, 2020; follow-up last ed until May 6, 2020. For the COPD cohort, individuals were eligible if they were aged 35 years or older, had COPD, were a current or former smoker, and were prescribed an ICS or long-acting β agonist plus long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LABA–LAMA) as combination therapy within the 4 months be fore the index date. For the asthma cohort, individuals were eligible if they were aged 18 years or older, had been diagnosed with asthma within 3 years of the index date, and were prescribed an ICS or short-acting β agonist (SABA) only within the 4 months before the index d...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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AbstractThe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is caused by Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and presents with respiratory symptoms which can be life threatening in severe cases. At the start of the pandemic, allergy, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were considered as risk factors for COVID-19 as they tend to exacerbate during respiratory viral infections. Recent literature has not shown that airway allergic diseases is a high-risk factor or that it increases the severity of COVID-19. This is due to a decrease in Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene expression in the ...
Source: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
The pandemic due to the infection by the betacoronavirus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which began in Wuhan, People ’s Republic of China, in December 2019, causing the infectious coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19),1 surpassed 21 million infections and more than 700,000 deaths globally,2 with numbers that continue to rise. The prognosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection worsens when comorbidities such as high blood press ure (HBP), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus (DM), cardiovascular disease, and obesity are associated.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
We are living in a historic event: a novel virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), emerged in Wuhan, China at the end of 2019 and began its global circulation. By January 24, 2020, at least 830 cases and 26 fatalities were reported across Asia and the USA [1]. 6 months later, there are more than 8 million confirmed cases of the disease associated with SARS-CoV-2, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and over 430 000 reported deaths worldwide [2]. The pandemic has exposed cracks in healthcare systems throughout the world and identified populations vulnerable for severe disease and poorer outcome...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Editorials Source Type: research
AbstractCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly contagious infectious disease caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). From the epidemiological data, the picture emerges that the more severe etiopathologies among COVID-19 patients are found in elderly people. The risk of death due to COVID-19 increases exponentially with age. Eight out of 10 COVID-19 related deaths occur in people older than 65  years of age. Older patients with comorbid conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer have a mu...
Source: AGE - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory syndrome that emerged in the city of Wuhan and rapidly spread throughout the world causing a global pandemic.1 The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been identified as its causal agent.1 Factors such as older age or presence of comorbidities are frequently identified as variables with a negative effect on patients ’ prognosis.2 If we focus on the preexistent respiratory conditions, a higher risk of developing a severe infection has been reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory syndrome which emerged in the city of Wuhan and rapidly spread through the world causing a global pandemic1. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been identified as its causal agent1. Factors such as older age or presence of comorbidities are frequently identified as variables with a negative impact on patients ’ prognosis2. If we focus on pre-existent respiratory conditions, a higher risk of developing a severe infection has been reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease3.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
AbstractThe novel coronavirus disease COVID-19 is produced by SARS-CoV-2. WHO has declared COVID-19 as a public health emergency, with the most susceptible populations (requiring ventilation) being the elderly, pregnant women and people with associated co-morbidities including heart failure, uncontrolled diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and cancer. However, such general guidance does not provide information regarding COVID-19 risks in patients with suffering from pre-existing thyroid problems, and furthermore, we do not know whether patients with COVID-19 (symptomatic or without symptoms), who have n...
Source: Endocrine - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Since the first case of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) on January 22, 2020, the number of positive cases and deaths has rapidly increased.(1) The initial report of 140 hospitalized coronavirus (COVID-19) infected patients from Wuhan China indicated that allergic disease, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were not risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection.(2) However, the clinical features of this condition with cough and shortness of breath might mask, or mimic, an asthma exacerbation.(3) Given the evolving nature of this pandemic, this initial summary may not represent the clinical...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
The current coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, raises important questions as to whether pre-morbid use or continued administration of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) affects the outcomes of acute respiratory infections due to coronavirus. Many physicians are concerned about whether individuals positive for SARS-CoV-2 and taking ICS should continue them or stop them, given that ICS are often regarded as immunosuppressive. A number of key questions arise. Are people with asthma or COPD at increased risk of developing COVID-19? Do ICS modify th...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Editorials Source Type: research
The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) was recognized in December 2019 as a cause of severe pneumonia and has now led to a global pandemic.1 Respiratory illnesses caused by COVID-19 cover a range of severity. The identification of risk and protective factors for disease severity from COVID-19 is critical to direct development of new treatments and infection prevention strategies. Early large case series have identified a number of risk factors for severe disease, including older age, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, tobacco exposure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
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