Hibernating Animals Might Provide Clues For Fighting Alzheimer's

What does animal hibernation have to do with Alzheimer's? More than you might think. According to new research, the way that critters wake up from a long winter's rest could help scientists devise new treatments for dementia. Research from Leicester University have isolated a cold-activated protein, RBM3, which helps restore brain activity of animals that are coming out of long hibernation periods. Though the protein also exists in humans, it's been found to be missing among Alzheimer's patients, whose brains also commonly have a reduced number of synapses. Here's how it works: When animals go into hibernation, their number of brain synapses decreases so as to allow them to enter a prolonged state of inactivity. Then, the cold-activated protein RBM3 rebuilds the synapses when the animal wakes up, thereby restoring normal brain activity. The research believe that a drug that mimics the effect of this protein may have the potential to restore lost brain function among individuals suffering from neurodegenerative disorders. “The neuroprotective pathway identified in this study could be an important step forward," Dr. Hugh Perry, chairman of the Medical Research Counsil’s Neurosciences and Mental Health Board, which funded the study, told the Telegraph. "We now need to find something to reproduce the effect of brain cooling. Just as anti-inflammatory drugs are preferable to cold baths in bringing down a high temperature, we need to find drugs which can...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Authors: Gombosev A, Salazar CR, Hoang D, Cox CG, Gillen DL, Grill JJ Abstract Recruitment registries are novel tools to accelerate Alzheimer disease research accrual. Optimal methods to populate such registries remain largely unstudied. We sent postcards with 3 unique taglines (Alzheimer's Prevention Research, brain health research, general research) to 100,000 local residents aged 50 years and older to assess the effectiveness of recruiting to an online recruitment registry by mail. The postcard campaign recruited 273 new registry enrollees (0.27% overall response rate). Neither the response rate nor the demograp...
Source: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Neither a diagnosis of prostate cancer nor ADT use was associated with odds of MCI in this cross-sectional population-based study. PMID: 31821185 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 December 2019Source: NeuroImageAuthor(s): M. Belen Bachli, Lucas Sedeño, Jeremi K. Ochab, Olivier Piguet, Fiona Kumfor, Pablo Reyes, Teresa Torralva, María Roca, Juan Felipe Cardona, Cecilia Gonzalez Campo, Eduar Herrera, Andrea Slachevsky, Diana Matallana, Facundo Manes, Adolfo M. García, Agustín Ibáñez, Dante R. ChialvoAbstractAccurate early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases represents a growing challenge for current clinical practice. Promisingly, current tools can be complemented by computational decision-support methods to objectivel...
Source: NeuroImage - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
This study aimed to understand the experiences of people with dementia and their family members with respect to decision-making and their views on supported decision-making. Thirty-six interviews (twenty-one dyadic and fifteen individual) were undertaken with fifty-seven participants (twenty-five people living with dementia and thirty-two family members) across three states in Australia. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used as the methodological approach, with relational autonomy as a theoretical perspective. We identified two overarching themes relating to participants ’ experiences with decision-...
Source: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry - Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: research
The lymphatic system is a parallel circulatory system responsible for moving fluid, immune cells, and a range of vital molecules around the body. It is of particular importance to immune function, allowing components of the immune system to carry messages from place to place in the body, and communicate and coordinate the immune response at the hubs known as lymph nodes. Like all tissues in the body, the lymphatic system is negatively impacted by aging, and this has widespread detrimental effects throughout the body and brain. For example, lymph nodes become disrupted in structure and function by the presence of sen...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
New research in mice and flies suggests that failure to transport molecules that break down proteins in neurons may lead to neurodegenerative diseases.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news
Conclusions Dysautonomic symptoms frequently occuring in α-synucleinopathies comprise cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, urogenital and thermoregulatory disturbances. These symptoms reduce quality of life and worsen prognosis. The understanding of their pathophysiology, as well as the detection of α-synuclein deposition and autonomic dysfunction in the premotor stages of α-synucleinopathies may be key for identifying novel treatment targets and improving clinical outcomes. While causative treatment is not yet available, improvement of quality of life can be achieved by personalized symptomatic treatment r...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Imagine a world in which caring for the deeply forgetful is deemed a privilege and a trust.By Stephen PostAlzheimer's Reading RoomI do believe that we will see a spiritual-cultural shift away from the ideology of “hyper-cognitive values” that has regrettably blinded us to the enduring selves underlying the deeply forgetful.How can we encounter the deeply forgetful outside of hyper-cognitive ideologies?Dementia Patients are People TooHow can we bear witness to the reality that persons with this cognitive disability possess inherent qualities, and create a culture where all are welcomed and celebrated regardless ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alz alzheimers bond cruelty deeply forgetful dehumanizing others demenitia glass half full love privilege self identity Spiritual Cultural Evolution Stephen Post trust Source Type: blogs
This was a descriptive study of elderly persons with dementia who were found dead after becoming lost in the community. Nineteen forensic autopsy cases were performed at Kochi Medical School, Japan. The mean age of the patients (9 males and 10 females) was 82.1 ± 6.6 years. Causes of death were drowning (n = 8), trauma (n = 5), hypothermia (n = 2), and debilitation possibly due to fatigue (n = 1) or were unknown (n = 3). Thirteen (68%) individuals had been reported missing, most at least 6 hours after they had left. They moved on foot (n = 14), by car (n = 3), or by bicycle (n = 2). Distances from residences to spot...
Source: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Current Topics in Research Source Type: research
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