Diabetes drug boosts survival in patients with type 2 diabetes and COVID-19 pneumonia

(Boston Children's Hospital) Sitagliptin, a drug to lower blood sugar in type 2 diabetes, also improves survival in diabetic patients hospitalized with COVID-19, suggests a multicenter observational study in Italy. Patients given sitagliptin in addition to insulin had a mortality rate of 18 percent as compared with 37 percent in matched patients receiving only insulin. Led by Paolo Fiorina, MD, PhD, of Boston Children's Hospital, the study involved seven Italian hospitals during the first surge of COVID cases last spring.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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Authors: Rombauts A, Abelenda-Alonso G, Cuervo G, Gudiol C, Carratalà J Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite adequate antibiotic coverage, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality worldwide. It induces both a local pulmonary and a systemic inflammatory response, particularly significant in severe cases. The intensity of the dysregulated host response varies from patient to patient and has a negative impact on survival and other outcomes. AREAS COVERED: This comprehensive review summarizes the pathophysiological aspects of the inflammatory response in CAP, brie...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Shreeram Akilesh, Cynthia C. Nast, Michifumi Yamashita, Kammi Henriksen, Vivek Charu, Megan L. Troxell, Neeraja Kambham, Erika Bracamonte, Donald Houghton, Naila I. Ahmed, Chyi Chyi Chong, Bijin Thajudeen, Shehzad Rehman, Firas Khoury, Jonathan E. Zuckerman, Jeremy Gitomer, Parthassarathy C. Raguram, Shanza Mujeeb, Ulrike Schwarze, M. Brendan Shannon
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Reumatología Clínica (English Edition)Author(s): Lina María Saldarriaga Rivera, Daniel Fernández Ávila, Wilson Bautista Molano, Daniel Jaramillo Arroyave, Alain Jasaf Bautista Ramírez, Adriana Díaz Maldonado, Jorge Hernán Izquierdo, Edwin Jáuregui, María Constanza Latorre Muñoz, Juan Pablo Restrepo, Juan Sebastián Segura Charry
Source: Reumatologia Clinica - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVE: We aimed to observe the clinical characteristics of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with overweight and obesity. METHODS: Consecutive COVID-19 patients from 10 hospitals of Jiangsu province, China were enrolled. RESULTS: 297 COVID-19 patients were included. 39.39% and 13.47% of patients were overweight and obese, respectively. The proportions of bilateral pneumonia (92.50% vs. 73.57%, P=0.033) and type 2 diabetes (17.50% vs. 3.57%, P=0.006) were higher in patients with obesity than lean patients. The proportions of severe illness in patients with overweight (12.82% vs. 2....
Source: Obesity - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Tags: Obesity (Silver Spring) Source Type: research
AbstractCOVID-19 is an infectious respiratory disease which firstly occurred in Wuhan, China and evolved rapidly around the globe. The causative pathogen is a novel coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2 with genomic similarities with SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The disease is transmitted among humans either through direct contact or via droplets from sneeze or cough. Most infected persons remain asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic, but some patients may develop severe clinical features, including pneumonia, respiratory failure, sepsis and even death. People of advanced age and/or with underlying diseases (including diabetes mellitus) ar...
Source: Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Abstract Recent retrospective studies of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) disease (COVID-19) revealed that the patients with common comorbidities of cancers and chronic diseases face significantly poorer clinical outcomes than those without. Since the expression profile of ACE2, a crucial cell entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2, could indicate the susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection, here we systematically dissected ACE2 expression using large-scale multi-omics data from 30 organs/tissues, 33 cancer types and some common chronic diseases involving>28 000 samples. It was found that...
Source: J Cell Mol Med - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: J Cell Mol Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Obesity, diabetes, and hypertension were significantly associated with severe COVID-19 on admission and the association of obesity was stronger in patients
Source: Obesity - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Tags: Obesity (Silver Spring) Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe use of DPP4 inhibitors, such as gliptins, in patients with COVID-19 with, or even without, type 2 diabetes, may offer a simple way to reduce the virus entry and replication into the airways and to hamper the sustained cytokine storm and inflammation within the lung in patients diagnosed with COVID-19 infection.
Source: Acta Diabetologica - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusions Although clinical data supporting an influence of all these drugs on the course of the disease are limited, this is an interesting background for further research that might help unravel the complex mechanisms underlying the link between COVID-19 and diabetes.
Source: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
The healing power of ultraviolet light (UV) has flown under the radar for decades. Yet, it’s one of the most powerful detoxifying agents known to man. It kills bacteria and viruses and can be used in a clinical setting. The therapeutic benefits of light have been known for millennia. Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, believed light was essential to balance the body and emotions. And there is good reason why, during the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, medics discovered that severely ill patients had hugely better recovery rates when they were nursed outside and had regular exposure to sunlight.1 You see, UV r...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: news
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