Prenatal PM2.5 exposure/vitamin D- associated early persistent atopic dermatitis via placental methylation.

CONCLUSION: Higher PM2.5 during the first trimester of pregnancy and low CB vitamin D affected early onset persistent AD, and the most sensitive window was weeks 6-7 of gestation. Placental DNA methylation mediated this effect. PMID: 32971247 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research

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Abstract BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease common among infants and children. It is associated with a high risk of allergies, asthma, and mental health problems. Attempts have been made to use probiotics in clinical interventions for AD. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to perform an updated meta-analysis of recently published studies to evaluate the effect of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of AD in children and to further understand the role of probiotics in AD interventions in the clinic. METHOD: We searched the PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Re...
Source: Paediatric Drugs - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Paediatr Drugs Source Type: research
AbstractBackgroundAtopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease common among infants and children. It is associated with a high risk of allergies, asthma, and mental health problems. Attempts have been made to use probiotics in clinical interventions for AD.ObjectiveOur objective was to perform an updated meta-analysis of recently published studies to evaluate the effect of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of AD in children and to further understand the role of probiotics in AD interventions in the clinic.MethodWe searched the PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials,...
Source: Pediatric Drugs - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Håvard Ove Skjerven, Eva Maria Rehbinder, Riyas Vettukattil, Marissa LeBlanc, Berit Granum, Guttorm Haugen, Gunilla Hedlin, Linn Landrø, Benjamin J Marsland, Knut Rudi, Kathrine Dønvold Sjøborg, Cilla Söderhäll, Anne Cathrine Staff, Kai-Håkon Carlsen, Anna Asarnoj, Karen Eline Stensby Bains, Oda C Lødrup Carlsen, Kim M Advocaat Endre, Peder Annæus Granlund, Johanne Uthus HermansenSummaryBackgroundSkin emollients applied during early infancy could prevent atopic dermatitis, and early comple...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewProgestogen hypersensitivity (PH) is a condition which typically occurs in women in childbearing years with a spectrum of symptoms ranging from urticaria with or without angioedema, dermatitis to systemic anaphylaxis. Herein, a clinical case of PH is presented followed by a discussion on the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of PH.Recent FindingsProgestogen hypersensitivity (a.k.a. “autoimmune progesterone dermatitis”) symptoms are associated with exogenous progestin exposure (e.g., contraceptive medicines, in vitro fertilization therapy) or endogenous progesterone from progesterone...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD), food allergy (FA), asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR) are common; according to a national birth cohort study in Japan, almost half of pregnant women reported a history of allergic disease.1 Given that genetic factors, including family history, are predictors of allergic diseases in offspring, we expect the birth of many infants who carry a high risk of developing allergies. Among allergy prevention strategies, the effectiveness of primary prevention of eczema in high-risk infants by the topical application of emollient during the neonatal period has been demonstrated in two ...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Allergic diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, food allergy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis, are common; according to a national birth cohort study in Japan, almost half of pregnant women reported a history of allergic disease.1 Given that genetic factors, including family history, are predictors of allergic diseases in offspring, we expect the birth of many infants with a high risk of developing allergies. Among allergy prevention strategies, the effectiveness of primary prevention of eczema in high-risk infants by the topical application of emollient during the neonatal period has been demonstrated in 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs).
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Conclusion: Allergic diseases seem to be linked to several risk factors in our population of school children. Many environmental factors might be incriminated in these allergic diseases.
Source: Medical Principles and Practice - Category: Internal Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusions: Infant sneezing without colds predicted all allergy diseases at 6 years of age in a subtropical country. This highlights a potential non-invasive clue in a subtropical region for the early prediction, treatment and prevention of childhood allergy diseases in infancy. PMID: 29484145 [PubMed]
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
ConclusionsExposure to prenatal maternal psychosocial stress was associated with increased risk, albeit modestly, of asthma and allergy in the offspring. The pronounced risk during the third trimester may represent cumulative stress exposure throughout pregnancy rather than trimester‐specific effect. Our findings may represent a causal effect or a result of inherent biases in studies, particularly residual confounding.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Clinical and Experimental Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Original Article ‐Epidemiology of Allergic Disease Source Type: research
Objective: Our aim was to compare the prevalence of asthma at 6-8 years of age in children previously hospitalized with bronchiolitis, with simple versus dual/multiple viral infection.Methods: We included all children currently aged 6-8 years, previously hospitalised in 2008-2011 due to acute bronchiolitis, with positive viral detection. 244 parents were contacted by phone (52 confections and 192 single-infections). DOata were collected using the validated International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Children(ISAAC) Questionnaire. According ISAAC criteria, Asthma was defined as wheezing in the previous 12 months.Results:...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Paediatric Respiratory Infection and Immunology Source Type: research
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