SAMHD1 as the Potential Link Between SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Neurological Complications

The recent pandemic of coronavirus infectious illness 2019 (COVID19) triggered by SARS-CoV-2 has rapidly spread around the globe, generating in severe events an acute, highly lethal pneumonia and death. In the past two hitherto similar CoVs, the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV-1) and Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV) also gained universal attention as they produced clinical symptoms similar to those of SARS-CoV-2 utilizing angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) to go into the cells. COVID-19 may also present with overtly neurological symptoms. The proper understanding of the expression and dissemination of ACE2 in central and peripheral nerve systems is crucial to understand better the neurological morbidity caused by COVID-19. Using the STRING bioinformatic tool and references through text mining tools associated to Coronaviruses, we identified SAMHD1 as the probable link to neurological symptoms. Paralleled to the response to influenza A virus and, specifically, respiratory syncytial virus, SARS-CoV-2 evokes a response that needs robust induction of a subclass of cytokines, including the Type I and, obviously, Type III interferons as well as a few chemokines. We correlate ACE2 to the pathogenesis and neurologic complications of COVID-19 and found that SAMHD1 links to NF-κB pathway. No correlation was found with other molecules associated with Coronavirus infection, including ADAR, BST2, IRF3, IFI...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research

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Authors: Rombauts A, Abelenda-Alonso G, Cuervo G, Gudiol C, Carratalà J Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite adequate antibiotic coverage, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality worldwide. It induces both a local pulmonary and a systemic inflammatory response, particularly significant in severe cases. The intensity of the dysregulated host response varies from patient to patient and has a negative impact on survival and other outcomes. AREAS COVERED: This comprehensive review summarizes the pathophysiological aspects of the inflammatory response in CAP, brie...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
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Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
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Source: Reumatologia Clinica - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
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Source: Roche Media News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news
The year of the rat is off to an ominous start. “We just stay home and don’t go out,” says Mr. Dong. The 33-year-old researcher, who provided only one name, has no other options. He, his wife and their 3-month-old daughter live in Wuhan, the epicenter of an unfolding global health crisis. They’re treating the forced time at home as a holiday, though he says, “this is different than any of them before.” Families like his huddle in their homes, fearful that if they venture out, they will get sick. Since the first cases of a previously unknown pneumonia-like illness emerged in December, Wuh...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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