Covid-19 Social Study: Results Release 21, Nuffield Foundation

This UCL study focuses on psychological responses to the first twenty-six weeks since just before the UK lockdown was first announced (21/03 to 20/09). They present simple descriptive results on the experiences of adults in the UK. Measures include:1. Reported compliance with government guidelines and confidence in the government 2. Mental health including depression, anxiety and stress 3. Harm including thoughts of death or self-harm, self-harm and both psychological&physical abuse 4. Psychological and social wellbeing including life satisfaction, loneliness and happiness 5. ***New in this report*** Vaccine attitudes and flu&Covid-19 vaccine intentions
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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‘It would go away without the vaccine,’ Trump says on ABC town hall.Half of world ’s schoolchildren unable to attend classrooms;Virus death toll linked to Maine wedding grows to 7; Follow the latest updatesWorld still at the beginning of the pandemic, WHO expert warnsSweden records its fewest daily cases since MarchCovid cases near 30m; China expects vaccine in NovemberWorld map: which countries have the most cases and deaths?See all our coronavirus coverage5.01amBSTIndia ’s coronavirus cases have passed 5 million, testing the country’s feeble health care system in tens of thousands of impover...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news UK news US news Australia news Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news
In conclusion, I hope that you will buy this book and share it with your family and friends. It is meant to be a conversation piece. Instead of gathering dust on a bookshelf, it is designed to lie on a living room table (like so many architecture and interior design books), for visitors to see and discuss over a martini or glass of wine. I hope that it will alleviate some depression and anxiety, spark a fact ‐​filled discussion around the dining room table, and maybe even change some minds. Strangers things have happened. Cheers!
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
The COVID-19 pandemic has been stressful for all of us, and this includes our youngest children. It’s easy, and tempting, to think that infants, toddlers, and preschoolers aren’t affected by the pandemic. The truth is, though, that that life has changed for them, too — and for some of them it has changed dramatically. Even if the change is mostly positive for them — such as having their parents home all the time — it’s still a change that can be confusing and unsettling. Young children are less able to understand the nuances of all of this; for them, the world truly is all about them. An...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Children's Health Parenting Source Type: blogs
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Article in Context: Three ways to protect your mental health during –and after– COVID-19 New report: Empowering 8 Billion Minds via Ethical Development and Adoption of Neurotechnologies Infographic on the Digital Brain Health Market 2012–2020 Five reasons the future of brain enhancement is digital, pervasive and (hopefully) bright Ten neurotechnologies about to transform brain enhancement & health 10 highlights from the 2019 SharpBrains Virtual Summit
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness anxiety clinical depression cognitive-behavioral-therapy crisis mental distress mental health mental health crisis mental health curve telehealth telehealth the Source Type: blogs
The global novel coronavirus pandemic afflicting everyone is showing mixed signs of activity. In some countries it appears to be easing, while in others it appears to be experiencing a resurgence. It’s not at all clear when the pandemic will end, but it’s unlikely to do so before 2021. What has become increasingly clear is that the toll of the pandemic will impact more than the people who come down with COVID-19. The mental health impact of living with a pandemic is being mostly ignored — for now. But as the deaths continue to rise, we need to pay close attention to the cost of the pandemic’s reperc...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Grief and Loss Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs
Long after most people have returned to work, even with social distancing, wearing masks, taking extreme care to wash hands rigorously and often, avoiding crowds, and limiting time in small confined spaces, there’s still the home environment to contend with. According to some experts, it’s more likely people can contract COVID-19 at home than outdoors and in some places long suspect, such as grocery stores. Without minimizing the importance of home cleanliness, excessive home cleaning for COVID-19 can trigger anxiety. These steps can help. Make cleaning a ritual, yet don’t spend hours doing it. Rituals an...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic compulsive cleaning coronavirus COVID-19 Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Spring Cleaning Source Type: blogs
Of the many ways COVID-19 has changed American life, social distancing is among the toughest for many people to bear. Humans are social animals, hard-wired to crave touch and interaction. So it’s only natural that, as caution fatigue sets in and social-distancing guidelines in many places are extended into the indeterminate future, even well-intentioned people are looking for loopholes that allow them to reunite with loved ones. But is there any safe way to see family or friends while following social-distancing guidelines? “There’s no magic answer to that question,” says Jason Farley, a professor a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
With the novel coronavirus outbreak of 2020 raging across the world with little end in sight, people’s mental health is starting to become seriously impacted. There’s no easy way to say this — people are struggling right now. Stay-at-home orders, while invaluable and helping from a public health perspective, are taking their toll on people’s emotional state. And if you were already vulnerable due to a mental illness diagnosis or concern you were grappling with, the outbreak of COVID-19 has only made things worse. The problem is that most public health experts are spending time talking about the phy...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 Depression Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: I did not have a clear answer for my couple. But after thinking and writing about this question it seems that the most reasonable approach in this crisis is transparent information–no matter how stark. And, crucially, we must have space for public debate. I hate this virus. I wish it never came. But we can make it worse by avoiding hard discussions on tradeoffs, the limits of modern medicine and risk. JMM P.S. I am very interested in your rebuttals to any of my assertions but will block vitriol and politicized nonsense. Related posts: The Debacle of Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin for ...
Source: Dr John M - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
UCLA, in partnership with Beyonc é’s BeyGOOD initiative, has created an online COVID-19 Care Package to help people struggling with stress and anxiety brought on or worsened by the novel coronavirus pandemic. This is the first offering of UCLA ’s newSTAND Together During COVID-19 website, which will help people cope during this stressful time by providing  self-care strategies and exercises based on research-backed cognitive behavioral therapy principles.BeyGOOD recognizes how important it is to alleviate the immense mental health burden placed on essential employees who continue to work outsid...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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