Prevalence of Kidney Injury and Associations with Critical Illness and Death in Patients with COVID-19.

CONCLUSIONS: Kidney injury is common in coronavirus disease 2019, and it is associated with poor clinical outcomes. PODCAST: This article contains a podcast at https://www.asn-online.org/media/podcast/CJASN/2020_09_17_CJN04780420.mp3. PMID: 32943396 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION Although COVID-19 affects mainly the lungs, it can also impact the kidneys. Increased serum creatinine and BUN, hematuria, proteinuria, and AKI were frequent findings in patients with severe COVID-19 and were related to an increased mortality rate. Further studies focusing on renal changes and their implications for the clinical condition of patients infected with the novel coronavirus are needed.RESUMO OBJETIVO Apresentar uma revis ão sobre as alterações renais nos pacientes com COVID-19. MÉTODOS Foi realizada uma revisão sistemática de literatura para buscar estudos re...
Source: Revista da Associacao Medica Brasileira - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly worldwide. Here, we review recently published studies on COVID-19-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in China. The pooled incidence of AKI in all reported COVID-19 patients was 6.5%, with a much higher rate in patients from the ICU (32.5%). AKI is associated with the severity of COVID-19 and the mortality rates, which is similar to other kidney abnormalities including proteinuria and hematuria. The renal tubule is the main site of injury in COVID-19 patients, and the etiology of renal impairment in COVID-19 patients is likely diverse and multifactorial.
Source: Seminars in Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is commonly associated with kidney damage, and the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor for SARS-CoV-2 is highly expressed in the proximal tubule cells. Whether patients with COVID-19 present specific manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction remains unknown. To test this, we examined a cohort of 49 patients requiring hospitalization in a large academic hospital in Brussels, Belgium. There was evidence of proximal tubule dysfunction in a subset of patients with COVID-19, as attested by low-molecular-weight proteinuria (70-80%), neutral aminoaciduria (46%), and defective ha...
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: clinical investigation Source Type: research
Conclusion: We report a high burden of AKI among underserved COVID-19 patients with multiple comorbidities. Those who had HA-AKI had worse clinical outcomes compared to those who with CA-AKI. A history of heart failure is an independent predictor of AKI in patients with COVID-19.Cardiorenal Med 2020;10:223 –231
Source: Cardiorenal Medicine - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Narayan Prasad, N Gopalakrishnan, Manisha Sahay, Amit Gupta, Sanjay K Agarwal, On behalf of Covid-19 Working Group of Indian Society of NephrologyIndian Journal of Nephrology 2020 30(3):143-154 COVID-19 is caused by a novel beta coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) strain that was first discovered in 2019 in the Wuhan city of China. Based on virus genome sequencing studies, the bat is suspected as the natural host of virus, and infection might be transmitted from bats via unknown intermediate hosts like reptiles and snakes etc., to infect humans. COVID-19 is transmitted from person to person contact, primarily via droplet infection w...
Source: Indian Journal of Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
(ERA-EDTA) Many COVID-19 patients experience hematuria, proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine concentration early in the course of the disease. Furthermore, acute kidney injury is a relevant clinical complication in patients with Covid-19 and is associated with a poor prognosis. An autopsy study from Hamburg shows that the novel coronavirus also affects the kidneys. Renal parameters may have prognostic relevance for the course of COVID-19.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
la NA Abstract The new disease produced by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) represents a major pandemic event nowadays. Since its origin in China in December 2019, there is compelling evidence that novel SARS-CoV-2 is a highly transmissible virus, and it is associated to a broad clinical spectrum going from subclinical presentation to severe respiratory distress and multi-organ failure. Like other coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2 recognizes the human Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 (hACE2) as a cellular receptor that allows it to infect different host cells, and likely disrupts the renin...
Source: American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology - Category: Physiology Authors: Tags: Am J Physiol Renal Physiol Source Type: research
It is now well known that patients with novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) commonly have kidney complications, including acute kidney injury, proteinuria, and hematuria. Recent publications in this journal used electron microscopy (EM) to detect the virus in autopsy or biopsy specimens of the kidney1,2. Most of the published images depicting the suspected virus are very similar, if not identical, to MVB. MVB have been well-known since the 1960s and their appearance and occurrence is detailed in the classic monograph of Feroze Ghadially3; however, their e...
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: letters to the editor Source Type: research
It is now well known that patients with novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) commonly have kidney complications, including acute kidney injury, proteinuria, and hematuria. Recent publications in Kidney International used electron microscopy (EM) to detect the virus in autopsy or biopsy specimens of the kidney.1,2 Most of the published images depicting the suspected virus are very similar, if not identical, to multivesicular bodies (MVBs).
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
A 79-year-old man of African ancestry, with a history of hemorrhagic stroke, monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, and stage 3 chronic kidney disease due to hypertension, was admitted to Bichat Hospital on day 1 after the first symptom of COVID-19 (fever). Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 polymerase chain reaction was positive on nasal swab. At admission, urinary dipstick was normal and plasma creatinine was 224 μmol/l. On day 4 plasma albumin was at 29 g/l and proteinuria was 11.4 g per gram of urinary creatinine (80% of albumin).
Source: Kidney International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Nephrology Image Source Type: research
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