COVID Adds Risk for People With Addiction Disorders

People with a recent addiction disorder diagnosis were more likely than others to develop COVID-19, and the connection was strongest among those with opioid and tobacco use disorders, the findings showed.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

.
Source: Journal of Addictive Diseases - Category: Addiction Authors: Source Type: research
.
Source: Journal of Addictive Diseases - Category: Addiction Authors: Source Type: research
The coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19) pandemic emerged at a time of substantial investment in the United States substance use service infrastructure. A key component of this fiscal investment was funding for training and technical assistance (TA) from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to newly configured Technology Transfer Centers (TTCs), including the Addiction TTCs (ATTC Network), Prevention TTCs (PTTC Network), and the Mental Health TTCs (MHTTC Network).
Source: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment - Category: Addiction Authors: Source Type: research
Substance use disorders, particularly opioid addiction and smoking, appear to increase the risk for COVID-19, new research shows.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Psychiatry Headlines - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news
During the COVID-19 pandemic, social distancing measures have made in-person mutual help groups inaccessible to many individuals struggling with substance use disorders (SUDs). Prior to the pandemic, stakeholders in our community had sponsored a program to train volunteers to facilitate local Self-Management and Recovery Training (SMART Recovery) groups. As a result, the community established seven weekly SMART Recovery groups, which more than 200 community members attended. In March 2020, the community discontinued these groups due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Source: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment - Category: Addiction Authors: Source Type: research
Digital media&downloads Pain Relief Caused by SARS-CoV-2 Infection May Help Explain COVID-19 Spread New research shows SARS-CoV-2 promotes pain relief when it infects cells through a common protein receptor, neuropilin-1. The finding gives scientists a novel target for non-opioid pain therapeutics, while also offering an explanation for the unrelenting spread of COVID-19. Stacy Pigott Today University of Arizona Health SciencesKhanna_Raj_klh3067.jpg Doctoral student Lisa Boinon prepares buffers while Rajesh Khanna looks on. (Photo: Kris Hanning/University of Arizona Health Sciences)HealthCollege of Medicine - Tuc...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
Features an addiction treatment program in Colorado that transformed six RVs into mobile clinics to reach rural and remote communities across the state. Even while other addiction clinics closed during the COVID-19 pandemic, the mobile clinics continued to provide addiction services, including a telehealth bridge to connect patients with doctors who can prescribe medicine to fight addiction.
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - Category: Rural Health Source Type: news
(University of Houston) Long after a COVID-19 vaccination is developed and years after the coronavirus death toll is tallied, the impact on mental health will linger, continuing to inflict damage if not addressed, according to new research. A psychology researcher at the University of Houston has published two papers discussing the psychological, addictive and health behavior issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic from a behavioral science perspective.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
A new study from the Journal of Addictive Diseases is highlighting one way that people are trying to cope with the stressful situation of the Covid-19 pandemic- using cannabis.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tags: Vices /vices Lifestyle /lifestyle Innovation /innovation Healthcare /healthcare Source Type: news
Conclusion: Mitigation of these effects by identifying subjects at risk and promoting dopaminergic homeostasis to help regulate stress-relative hypodopaminergia, attenuate fears, and prevent subsequent unwanted drug and non-drug RDS type addictive behaviors seems prudent. PMID: 32957797 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Substance Use and Misuse - Category: Addiction Tags: Subst Use Misuse Source Type: research
More News: Addiction | COVID-19 | Health | Smokers